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  2. mikew

    Spitfire No. 944

    I enjoyed that. Thanks for posting it.
  3. Whizkid

    Spitfire No. 944

    What a great movie! Can't be too many guys who can watch themselves from 60 -odd years ago, and at War yet! How things have changed................"Put that cigarette out!"
  4. cobraj

    Monday

    afternoon all, trying to plod through the day. welcome break coming up. will be heading north tomorrow afternoon to Sunday. can't wait.
  5. cobraj

    Spitfire No. 944

    how cool was that having the grandson there and giving him all the movies!
  6. cobraj

    Saturday

    works ugly head showed up and was unable to go... but did see it fly over.. enormous plane. cannot imagine when there were hundreds taking off!
  7. Donster

    Spitfire No. 944

    Great little documentary!
  8. Donster

    Monday

    Morning all. Cloudy and 69F. Partly cloudy, turning less humid by the afternoon. High of 85F.
  9. Curtiss-Wright Ad - July 1943 1940: Hitler issues Directive No.16, orders for the planning of 'Operation Sealion', the invasion of Britain. Twenty divisions are earmarked for the invasion, but the Luftwaffe must gain air superiority first. All plans are to be ready by mid-August. 1940: Destroyer Imogen sinks in Pentland Firth after collision in fog by the British light cruiser HMS Glasgow. *Gloria DeHaven 1940: Japanese Cabinet resigns under army pressure. 1941: Army Group South traps 20 Russians divisions in a pocket at Uman. Gloria DeHaven 1942: 12,887 Jews of Paris are rounded up and sent to Drancy Internment Camp located outside the city. 1943: Canadians forces take Caltagirone, 40 miles inland from Syracuse. The Americans take Agringento, before beginning their drive for Palermo. The British finally secure Primosole bridge and Montgomery advances on Catania. Gloria DeHaven 1944: The Brody pocket begins to form in the northern Ukraine, trapping 40,000 German troops. 1944: The Eighth Army captures Arezzo and reaches the Arno river. Gloria DeHaven 1945: At 5.30 am, the first atomic bomb is exploded at a test site in Los Alamos, USA. Gloria DeHaven *Gloria Mildred DeHaven was born on July 23, 1925 in Los Angeles, California, the daughter of actor-director Carter DeHaven and actress Flora Parker DeHaven, both former vaudeville performers. She began her career as a child actor with a bit part in Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times" (1936). She was signed to a contract with MGM Studios, but despite featured roles in such films as "The Thin Man Goes Home" (1944) and "Summer Stock" (1950), she did not achieve film stardom. She portrayed her mother in the Fred Astaire film "Three Little Words" (1950). DeHaven also appeared as a regular in the television series and soap operas "As the World Turns", "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman" and "Ryan's Hope". She was one of the numerous celebrities enticed to appear in the all-star box office flop "Won Ton Ton", the "Dog Who Saved Hollywood" (1976), and has guest starred in such television series as "Robert Montgomery Presents", "The Guy Mitchell Show", "The Rifleman", "Wagon Train", "The Lloyd Bridges Show", "Marcus Welby, M.D.", "Gunsmoke", "Fantasy Island", "Hart to Hart", "The Love Boat", "Highway to Heaven", "Murder, She Wrote" and "Touched By An Angel". In the late 1960s and early 1970s, DeHaven hosted a morning call-in movie show, "Prize Movie", on WABC-TV in New York City. Gloria DeHaven DeHaven has been married four times to three different men. Her first husband was actor John Payne whom she married on December 28, 1944 and divorced in 1950. Her second husband was Martin Kimmell; they were married June 21, 1953 and divorced the following year. She was married to Richard Fincher from 1957 until 1963; they remarried in 1965 and divorced in 1969. She has two children with Payne, daughter Kathleen Hope born 1945 and son Thomas John born 1947. She has two additional children with Fincher, son Harry born 1958 and daughter Faith born 1962. DeHaven has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6933 Hollywood Blvd. DeHaven died on July 30, 2016 in Las Vegas of undisclosed causes a week after her 91st birthday while in hospice care after having had a stroke a few months earlier. TRIVIA: Measurements: 34-24-34 Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation Ad - July 1943
  10. Stans

    Monday

    Morning y'all, clear skies and 73F. Expecting a hot and humid partly cloudy day. Today's forecast high is 93F
  11. Last week
  12. Stans

    Spitfire No. 944

    Well worth watching, it's a little under 15 minutes.
  13. Stans

    Sunday

    Morning y'all, clear skies, 69F, and the humidity is beginning to return. Expecting a mostly sunny day and a high of 93F, so summer has also returned.
  14. Stans

    Saturday

    I have seen the CAF's B-29 only once and that was... probably 30 years ago. Have a good time at the air show, Jay!
  15. Donster

    Sunday

    Morning all. 71F under overcast skies with fog. Isolated storms possible, mainly in the afternoon and evening. High of 86F.
  16. Campbell Soup Company Ad - July 1943 1940: Unemployment in Britain up 60,431 in June to 827,266, but still down half a million on June 1939. Home Office bans fireworks, kite and balloon flying. 1941: A US airbase is established at Argentia in Newfoundland. *Lizabeth Scott - YANK Pin-up Girl - Nov. 23, 1945 1941: British MAUD report recommends low yield U-235 bombs by 1943. 1941: Army Group Centre encircles Smolensk, along with a large body of Russians to the west of the City. Lizabeth Scott 1941: British forces enter Beirut. 1942: Final losses for convoy PQ-17 are 24 ships sunk for 141,721 tons. 8 ships were sunk by the Luftwaffe, 7 by U-boats and another 9 were combined Luftwaffe/U-boat kills. The loss of material was likewise very heavy with 210 aircraft, 430 tanks, 3350 lorries, and 99,316 tons of general cargo going to the bottom of the Arctic Ocean. The Germans lost only 5 planes and no U-boats. Lizabeth Scott 1942: The Germans take Boguchar and Millerovo, less than 200 miles from Stalingrad. However, they have only captured 80,000 Russian's since the 28th June. 1942: New Zealander troops attack 'Kidney' Ridge in three days of fighting, which costs Rommel 2,600 prisoners and 115 guns captured. Armour and Company Ad - July 1943 1942: The first supply flight from India to China over the 'Hump' is flown. 1944: Two Soviet armies from Crimea join the Baltic front so that it can continue its offensive. Russian tank penetrations are only 25 miles from Lvov. Lizabeth Scott 1945: The U.S. Third Fleet shells the steel center on Hokkaido Island in the Japanese homeland. It is reported that 108,000 tons of shipping has been sunk in last two days attacks. 1945: The Australians take Prince Alexander Range in Borneo after an eight-week struggle. Lizabeth Scott *Lizabeth Scott was born Emma Matzo on September 29, 1922 in the Pine Brook section of Scranton, Pennsylvania, the daughter of John and Mary Matzo, Roman Catholic immigrants from Slovakia. She attended Central High School and Marywood College. She later went to New York City and attended the Alvienne School of Drama. In late 1942, she was eking out a precarious living with a small Midtown Manhattan summer stock company when she got a job as understudy for Tallulah Bankhead in Thornton Wilder's play "The Skin of Our Teeth". However, Scott never had an opportunity to substitute for Bankhead. When Miriam Hopkins was signed to replace Bankhead, Scott quit and returned to her drama studies and some fashion modeling. She then received a call that Gladys George, who was signed to replace Hopkins, was ill, and Scott was needed back at the theatre. She went on in the leading role of "Sabina", receiving a nod of approval from critics at the tender age of 20. The following night, George was out again and Scott went on in her place. Soon afterward, Scott was at the Stork Club when film producer Hal Wallis asked who she was, unaware that an aide had already arranged an interview with her for the following day. When Scott returned home, however, she found a telegram offering her the lead for the Boston run of "The Skin of Our Teeth". She could not turn it down. She sent Wallis her apologies and went on the road. Though the Broadway production, in which she was credited as "Girl", christened her "Elizabeth", she dropped the "e" the day after the opening night in Boston, "just to be different". A photograph of Scott in Harper's Bazaar magazine was seen by movie agent Charles Feldman. He admired the fashion pose and took her on as a client. Scott made her first screen test at Warner Brothers, where she and Wallis finally met. Though the test was bad, the producer recognized her potential. As soon as Wallis set up shop at Paramount, she was signed to a contract. Her movie debut was in "You Came Along" (1945) opposite Robert Cummings. Lizabeth Scott Paramount publicity dubbed Scott "The Threat," in order to create an onscreen persona for her similar to Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake. Scott's smoky sensuality and husky voice lent itself to the film noir genre and, beginning with "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" (1946) starring Barbara Stanwyck and Van Heflin, the studio cast her in a series of noir thrillers. Film historian Eddie Muller has noted that no other actress has appeared in so many noir movies, with more than three quarters of her 20 films qualifying. The dark blonde actress was initially compared to Bacall because of a slight resemblance and a similar voice, even more so after she starred with Bacall's husband, Humphrey Bogart, in the 1947 noir thriller "Dead Reckoning". At the age of 25, Scott's billing and portrait were equal to Bogart's on the film's lobby posters and in advertisements. The movie was the first of many femme fatale roles for Scott. She also starred in "Desert Fury" (1947), a noir filmed in Technicolor, with John Hodiak, Burt Lancaster, Wendell Corey and Mary Astor. In it, she played Paula Haller, who, on her return from college, falls for gangster Eddie Bendix (Hodiak), and faces a great deal of opposition from the others. Scott was paired with Lancaster, Corey and Kirk Douglas in Wallis' "I Walk Alone" (1948), a noirish story of betrayal and vengeance. In 1949, she starred as a vicious femme fatale in "Too Late for Tears". The film is unusual for featuring her as the main character, rather than the supporting role most women were relegated to in film noirs of the period. Having being known professionally as Lizabeth Scott for 4 1/2 years, she appeared at the courthouse in Los Angeles, on October 20, 1949 and had her name legally changed. Another courtroom appearance came several years later, in 1955, when she sued Confidential magazine for stating that she spent her off-work hours with "Hollywood's weird society of baritone babes" (a euphemism for a lesbian) in an article which claimed Scott's name was found on the clients' list belonging to a call-girl agency. The suit was thrown out on a technicality. After completing "Loving You" (1957), Elvis Presley's second movie, Scott retired from the screen. Later that year, she would record her album, "Lizabeth". The next few years saw Scott occasionally guest-star on television, including a 1963 episode of "Burke's Law". After completing her final major film role, Scott signed a recording contract with Vik (a subsidiary of RCA) and recorded an album with Henri Rene and his orchestra (in Hollywood on October 28, 29 and 30, 1957). Simply titled Lizabeth, the tracks are a mixture of torch songs and playful romantic ballads. The recordings were arranged by George Wyle and Henri Rene, while Herman Diaz, Jr. produced and directed. The album is currently available on CD and online via iTunes. Despite some rumored romances, no positive records of a relationship exist, and Scott never married or produced any children. At least one book suggests she was a mistress of married film producer Hal Wallis. While she would continue to make some guest appearances on various television shows throughout the 1960s, much of her private time was dedicated to classes at the University of Southern California. In 1972, she made one final motion picture appearance, in "Pulp" with Michael Caine and Mickey Rooney. After that, she mostly kept away from public view and has declined many interview requests. She did, however, appear on stage at an American Film Institute tribute to Hal Wallis in 1987. In 2001, she was listed as one of the celebrity guests for the Michael Jackson: 30th Anniversary Special, which screened in the USA on CBS. More recently, she was photographed next to an image of herself on the poster for "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" at the AMPAS Centennial Celebration for Barbara Stanwyck on 16 May 2007. In 2003, Scott spoke substantially to Bernard F. Dick about her time in movies for his biography of producer Hal Wallis. In the book, the author remarks that during his conversation with Scott in a restaurant, Scott (then 81 years old) was able to recite her opening monologue from "The Skin of Our Teeth", which she performed on stage at age 20. The book, Hal Wallis: Producer to the Stars, includes the most comprehensive account of Scott's career available. Lizabeth Scott has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to motion pictures at 1624 Vine Street in Hollywood. Lizabeth Scott died of congestive heart failure at the age of 92 on January 31, 2015. American Meat Institute Ad - July 1945
  17. cobraj

    Saturday

    afternoon all, worked a 23 hour day yesterday running on adrenaline today. hope to see the b-29 FI-FI tomorrow in Nashua NH fly tomorrow!
  18. cobraj

    Time for my annual check in.

    hey Maine.. I have a place in Starks Maine now!
  19. Donster

    Very rare Corsair flies again

    Excellent!
  20. This Corsair is not a late model Vought F4U nor is it a Goodyear FG-1D. Nope, this rare Corsair is a one-of-a-kind today. It is fully restored and now flying, back from the swamps of North Carolina where it crashed in December 1944. It is the world's only flying Brewster F3A-1(A). http://warbirdsnews.com/warbird-restorations/brewster-f3a-corsair-takes-to-the-skies-in-breckenridge-texas.html The paint scheme would be correct for this era and the markings "L69" would indicate the training unit stationed at Mojave.
  21. Stans

    Saturday

    Morning y'all, clear skies, 64F and low humidity! Expecting sunshine and a high of 89F today.
  22. Stans

    Time for my annual check in.

    Hey, Maine!
  23. Donster

    Time for my annual check in.

    Welcome back Maine! LOL Madman!
  24. Donster

    Saturday

    Morning all. 71F with light rain. Isolated storms possible. Cooler. High of 86F.
  25. United States Rubber Company - July 1945 1940: Bastille Day in France declared 'day of meditation', de Gaulle and Free French lay wreaths at Cenotaph in London. Churchill broadcasts that Hitler must recast his invasion plans. 1940: British commandos launch a raid against Guernsey in the Channel Islands, with negligible results. *Donna Reed 1940: A force of German bombers attacks Suez, Egypt, from bases in Crete. 1941: Believing the campaign in the East soon to be concluded in Germany's favor, Hitler orders the German war industry to shift production away from guns and armored vehicles to U-boats and planes. Donna Reed 1941: Army Group North is now only 80 miles from Leningrad. 1941: An armistice is signed at Acre between Vichy and British/Free French forces. This requires all French material to be handed over to the British and gives the Vichy French the choice of joining the Free French or returning to France. Most opt for the latter. During the campaign the Vichy French suffered 3,350 killed or wounded, while the British and Free French lost about 2,400 men. United States Rubber Company - July 1945 1942: A program in occupied France begins. In 3 days 15,000-18,000 Jews are arrested and sent to concentration camps. Beginning of deportation of Dutch Jews to Auschwitz. 1942: Final losses for PQ17 are 24 out of 35 ships sunk. Donna Reed 1942: The advance by Army Group A towards Rostov continues against minimal Soviet resistance. 1942: A British attack against axis positions to the South of El Alamein is repulsed. Donna Reed 1943: RAF Coastal Command begins daily patrols over the Bay of Biscay with aircraft equipped with new detection devices to locate and destroy German U-boats leaving and entering their bases on the French coast. 1943: Joining in the counter-offensive by the Central, Bryansk and Western Fronts, the Soviet Voronezh Front launches attacks against the 4th Panzer Army and Army Detachment Kempf in the southern sector of the Kursk salient. Donna Reed 1943: British and German paratroops fight for key Primosole bridge in Sicily. 1944: Hitler leaves Berchtesgaden for the last time. 1944: A new Russian offensive begins in the northern Ukraine opens with massive support from the Red Air Force and gains up to 10 miles and recaptures Pinsk. Donna Reed 1945: The first Bastille Day for five years is celebrated enthusiastically by the French. 1945: The U.S. Third Fleet shells Kamaishi, 275 miles north of Tokyo. Donna Reed *Donna Reed was born Donna Belle Mullenger on a farm near Denison, Iowa on January 27, 1921. A small town - a population of less than 3,000 people - Denison was located by the Boyer River, and was the county seat of Crawford County. Donna grew up as a farm girl, much like many young girls in western Iowa, except for one thing - Donna was very beautiful. That wasn't to say that others weren't as pretty, it's just that Donna's beauty stood out from all the other local girls, so much so that she won a beauty contest in Denison. Upon graduation from high school Donna left for college in Los Angeles, in the hopes of eventually entering movies. While at Los Angeles City College, she pursued her dream by participating in several college stage productions. In addition to the plays, she also won the title of Campus Queen. At one of those stage plays Donna was spotted by an MGM talent scout and was signed to a contract. Her first film was a minor role in MGM's "The Getaway" (1941). That was followed by a small part in "Babes on Broadway" (1941), with Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland as a secretary. Afterwards, MGM began giving her better parts, in films such as "The Bugle Sounds" (1942), "The Courtship of Andy Hardy" (1942), "Eyes in the Night" (1942) and "The Man from Down Under" (1943). In 1943, she appeared in "The Human Comedy" with Mickey Rooney. In 1944 she received second billing playing Carol Halliday in "See Here, Private Hargrove" (1944), a comedy about a reporter drafted into the army who eventually meets up with Donna's character as a worker in the canteen. The following year Donna starred in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (1945), her best role to date. It was a love story set in London in 1890. It got mixed critical reviews but did well at the box-office. That film was followed by roles in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and "They Were Expendable", both in 1945. Her "girl-next-door" good looks and warm on-stage personality made her a popular pin-up for many GIs during WWII. She personally answered letters from many GIs serving overseas. Donna was now one of the leading ladies of Hollywood. In 1946 she starred in what is probably her best-known role, as the wife of James Stewart in the classic "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). This timeless story is a holiday staple to this day. The film also starred Lionel Barrymore and Thomas Mitchell. The next year Donna starred as Ann Daniels in Paramount's "Beyond Glory" (1948) with Alan Ladd, which did well at the box-office. Her next role was the strongest she had had yet--"Chicago Deadline" (1949), again with Ladd. It was one of the best mystery dramas to come out of Hollywood in a long time, and did very well at the box office. As the 1940s faded out and the 1950s stormed in, Donna's roles got bigger but were mainly of the wholesome, girl-next-door type. In 1953, however, she starred as the prostitute Alma in the widely acclaimed "From Here to Eternity" (1953). She was so good in that film she was nominated for and won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, beating out such veterans as Thelma Ritter and Marjorie Rambeau. The film itself won for Best Picture and remains a classic to this day. Later that year Donna starred in "The Caddy" (1953), a comedy with Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin. Three years later she landed the role of Sacajawea in "The Far Horizons" (1955), the story of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, starring Charlton Heston and Fred MacMurray. Donna Reed After finishing "The Whole Truth" (1958), Donna began her own TV series (produced by her husband), "The Donna Reed Show" (1958), a hit that ran for eight years. She was so effective in the show that she was nominated for TV's prestigious Emmy Award as Best Actress every year from 1959-1962. She was far more popular in TV than on the screen. After the run of the program, Donna took some time away from show business before coming back in a couple of made-for-TV movies (in 1974, she had made a feature called "Yellow-Headed Summer" (1974), but it was never released). She did get the role of Ellie Ewing Farlow in the hit TV series "Dallas" (1978) during the 1984-85 season. When Bel Geddes agreed to return to the role for the 1985-86 season, Reed was abruptly fired. She sued the show's production company for breach of contract and later settled out of court for over a million dollars. It was to be her final public performance. Reed died of pancreatic cancer in Beverly Hills, California on January 14, 1986, thirteen days short of her 65th birthday. She had been diagnosed with the terminal illness three months prior. Her husband Grover Asmus, actresses Shelley Fabares and Norma Connolly, and numerous friends, associates, and family members founded the Donna Reed Foundation for the Performing Arts. Based in Reed's hometown of Denison, the non-profit organization grants scholarships for performing arts students, runs an annual festival of performing arts workshops, and operates "The Donna Reed Center for the Performing Arts". Donna never forgot her roots. She was still a farm girl at heart. TRIVIA: Measurements: 34B-24-34 (measured in 1954), (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine). Height: 5' 7" (1.70 m) From 1943 to 1945, Reed was married to make up artist William Tuttle. In 1945, she married producer Tony Owen (1907-1984) with whom she had four children: Penny Jane, Anthony, Timothy, and Mary Anne (the two oldest children were adopted). Reed and Owen divorced in 1971, and three years later, she married retired U. S. Army Colonel Grover W. Asmus (1926-2003). On January 8, 1945, Donna went to Juarez, Mexico to obtain a divorce from Bill Tuttle. Returning home on the night of January 9, 1945, Donna boarded a plane in El Paso, Texas for a flight back to Los Angeles. Just as the plane was about to take off Donna was bumped from the flight to make room for a military officer. The airliner crashed on approach to Lockheed Air Terminal (now called Bob Hope Airport) in Burbank, California killing everyone on board. Reed's hometown of Denison, Iowa, hosts the annual Donna Reed Festival. Reed's childhood home was located on Donna Reed Drive in Denison but was destroyed by a fire in 1983. Reed's Academy Award is on display at W.A. McHenry museum house in Denison, Iowa. The woman on the cover of Rush's Permanent Waves album is modeled after her. United States Rubber Company - July 1945
  26. Madman

    Time for my annual check in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc Good to see you Maine.
  27. Maine 3rd

    Time for my annual check in.

    Nice to see you guys are still at it.
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