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Found 9 results

  1. With the release of the master templates for the Viggen, I have released skin packs for the Viggen with US Navy and Marine Corps markings. The skin packs represent A-6 squadrons from the 1980s-1990s, with A-6 BuNos (serial numbers) and MODEXes (side numbers) from historical record. The tactical paint scheme based on the MIL-STD-2161A(AS) pattern for the F-4 Phantom, which has a fuselage shape similar to the AJS-37 Viggen. The skin packs include six to eight skins, usually with one hi-color "CAG bird" as well as low color line birds. Each skin has a "normal" version and a weathered version. Weathered skins have a bleached effect as if the aircraft were heavily exposed to the sun for months on end. Normal skins include pilots with green flightsuits, while weathered skins include pilots with desert flightsuits. All links to the skins can be found here. Screenshots to follow
  2. How many of you know that the US Navy and Marine Corps used to fly the IAI Kfir (designated the F-21)? Both services used it as an adversary aircraft from 1987-1989, at which time it was replaced by the F-5. The IAI Kfir was based on the Mirage V airframe. We don't have a flyable Mirage V, but we do have a Mirage 2000! This is a USMC adversary from VMFT-401 in its original IAF Kfir colors as leased. DCS File Repository
  3. This is a series of US Navy and Marine Corps skin packs for the FJ-3/FJ-3M Fury, the navalized variant of the F-86 Sabre (the M version being Sidewinder capable). The idea of this series is to have a single skin for each squadron, and separate decals for each side number (Modex). The last 4 digits of the serial number (BuNo) use the USAF serial number to allow for dynamic BuNos, though the side number must be selected by choosing the skin itself. This will allow a common Modex pool and a single texture for each squadron, thereby allowing you to employ an entire squadron in a mission while keeping the hard drive and in-mission RAM footprint to a minimum. This post serves as a master links post. You can download the skin packs at the following mirrors: ED User Files: VF-24 Corsairs v1.1 VF-73 Jesters v1.1 VF-121 Pacemakers v1.1 VF-142 Fighting Falcons v1.1 VF-191 Satan's Kittens v1.1 VF-211 Red Checkertails v1.11 CombatAce: VF-24 VF-73 VF-121 VF-142 VF-191 VF-211 LOF: VF-24 VF-73 VF-121 VF-142 VF-191 VF-211
  4. Marine Light Helicopter Squadron (HML) 167 was commissioned in April 1968 in Vietnam, and flew the UH-1E in combat operations until June 1971, where it was the last Marine helicopter squadron in Vietnam. Of note, HML-167 was the first unit to drop a bomb from a helicopter, accomplished with the use of the Helicopter Trap Weapon (HTW). In June 1971, HML-167 returned stateside to MCAS New River, North Carolina, as part of the 2nd Marine Air Wing. In 1972, HML-167 received the UH-1N Twin Huey, which it would fly until 2012 when the UH-1N was replaced by the UH-1Y Venom. In 1984, HML-167 received its first AH-1T Cobras and became a composite squadron of Cobras and Hueys. HML-167 was redesignated Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron (HMLA) 167 in April 1986, and as such designated as a permanent composite squadron of both Cobras and Hueys. HMLA-167 began upgrading to the AH-1W Super Cobra in late 1989. Today the HMLA-167 "Warriors" fly the UH-1Y Venom and the AH-1W Super Cobra. This is a collection of eleven UH-1 skins representing HMLA-167. The skins included are: TV-30 (1969 as HML-167)* TV-29 (1970 as HML-167)* "Santa 1" (1969 as HML-167) TV-30 (1982 as HML-167) TV-11 (1999) TV-03 (ca. 2003) TV-06 (ca. 2003) TV-04 (ca. 2005) TV-06 (ca. 2005) TV-05 (CO bird ca. 2008) TV-00 (UH-1Y CO bird ca. 2013) * TV-29 and 30 (1969-70) are also included in my USMC Vietnam Skin Pack version 1.21 and later. And now, the Screenshots: TV-29, also as seen in the USMC Vietnam Skin Pack "Santa 1", the Huey painted up for Christmas 1969 to go around to all of the nearby villages and spread Christmas Cheer. A UH-1 Circa 2005, with a ca. 2003 bird in the background Commanding Officer's helo, ca. 2008 and CO's helo, ca. 2013 (based on the UH-1Y paint scheme) The skin pack can be found at ED, as well as CombatAce and LOF.
  5. I have just uploaded a skin pack for the 2/17th Cavalry (101st Airborne Div) to the DCS Repository and LOF. This will also be uploaded to Combat Ace once the file section is back up. The pack includes five skins representing A, B, C, F, and Headquarters Troops. Note that the B Troop skin here differs from the skin in the UH-1 Medal of Honor skin pack, so with both skin packs you will have even more variety! Here are some screenshots: Enjoy, once the file is approved!
  6. The skins included are: US Army 82nd Medical Detachment (Air Ambulance) US Army 2/17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division US Army 173rd Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Regiment US Army 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (#775) US Army 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (#888) USMC Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) I have added the names and ranks (at the time) of the pilots and co-pilots of these airframes at the time of the action. While I have attempted to be as accurate as these gentlemen deserve, I may have made some incorrect assumptions (this is especially true about the co-pilots, who are not as easily found in the public record). Likewise, I was unable to accurately represent GySgt Leroy Poulson and LCpl John Phelps of VMO-6, as the door gunner textures do not support it. If you see any inaccuracies, please let me know so that I may correct them. All reference imagery and much of the research was taken from http://vietnam-hueys... Honor page.htm The Airframes and the Medal of Honor Recipients: 82nd Medical Detachment (Air Ambulance) CW3 Michael Novosel - October 2, 1969 CW3 Michael Novosel was pilot-in-command of of a UH-1H med evac Huey with the 82nd Medical Detachment in 1969. On October 2, he went to the assistance of a group of wounded South Vietnamese soldiers that were pinned down by an enemy force concealed in a series of bunkers. Flying without any gunship cover, he made repeated runs against heavy enemy fire to pick up the wounded. Near the end of the action, he spotted a wounded ARVN soldier near an enemy bunker. He maneuvered the ship near the wounded man and a crewman reached down to grab and lift the wounded soldier into the aircraft. During the maneuver the aircraft was hit by enemy fire and CW3 Novosel was wounded. In all, Michael Novosel and his crew made 15 extractions in the face of enemy fire, saving 29 wounded South Vietnamese soldiers. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1971. 2/17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division Sp4 Joseph G. LaPointe - June 2, 1969 Sp4 Joseph "Guy" LaPointe was a medic with Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry. On June 2, 1969, he was just one day from going on leave to meet his wife and new son. However, SP4 LaPointe volunteered for a mission that day because his replacement was a new guy without any field experience. The patrol landed on the top of Hill 376, near the famous "Hamburger Hill" battle site. Sweeping away from the hilltop LZ, the point man walked into a fire zone from concealed enemy bunkers. Two more men were quickly wounded and "Doc" LaPointe moved forward to aid his wounded buddies. He put himself between the enemy bunkers and the wounded, and began working on the wounded. He was soon hit by enemy fire, but ignoring his own wounds he continued to shield his buddies while tending their wounds. He was hit by a second burst of fire and knocked away from his friends. He crawled back to the wounded again and once more shielded them from enemy fire while resuming his aid. This time an enemy grenade landed among the group, mortally wounding them all, including Doc LaPointe. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously on December 16, 1971. 173rd Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Regiment PFC Gary Wetzel - January 8, 1968 PFC (later Sp4c) Gary Wetzel was a door gunner on "Robin Hood 866" in January, 1968. He was nearing the end of his second tour when his helicopter was hit by an enemy RPG rocket while landing in a hot LZ with an insertion team. The grounded helicopter was hit repeatedly by enemy fire and the pilot, Bill Dismukes, was wounded. As PFC Wetzel went to the assistance of his pilot, another enemy rocket impacted the ship just behind the pilot's seat. Wetzel was blown out of the helicopter, suffering severe wounds to his right arm, chest and legs, and his left arm was almost severed from his body - hanging only by a flap of skin. In spite of his multiple wounds, Wetzel climbed back into the damaged ship and took an enemy automatic weapon position under fire with his door gun. The enemy gun had the American troops pinned and Wetzel was able to destroy it with his fire. Wetzel then tried to go to the aid of his pilot again, but passed out from loss of blood. When he regained consciousness, his crew chief was dragging the wounded pilot to the shelter of a nearby dike. Wetzel crawled over and attempted to help the crew chief move the pilot to safety, but passed out a second time. After he and the other survivors were rescued, Wetzel's left arm was amputated and he spent five months in military hospitals recovering from his injuries and infections. Gary Wetzel was awarded the Medal of Honor on November 19, 1968. Two skins from the 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division: Captain Ed Freeman - November 14, 1965 Captain Ed Freeman served as Second-in-command of A Company, 229th Aviation Battalion in 1965-66. On November 14, 1965, he flew in support of LTC Hal Moore and the 1/7th Cavalry fighting against three battalions of NVA at LZ X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley. Captain Freeman flew 14 missions into the face of enemy fire over the course of the first day to deliver much needed ammo and water, and to evacuate wounded soldiers. He was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at LZ X-Ray on July 16, 2001. Major Bruce Crandall - November 14, 1965 Major Bruce Crandall was commander of A Company, 229th Aviation Battalion, on November 14, 1965 at LZ X-Ray. With Captain Freeman's ship following him, Major Crandall flew 14 mission into the hot LZ , taking intense enemy fire to deliver supplies and evacuate wounded from the battle. As his ship was damaged by enemy fire (his crew chief was also wounded on one flight), Major Crandall was forced to switch to another aircraft. He flew a total of three different ships in his effort to support the troops at LZ X-Ray. Major Crandall was finally awarded the Medal of Honor on February 26, 2007. And USMC Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6). Captain Stephen Pless, USMC - August 19, 1967 Note: this is the same skin as the one released in my USMC Vietnam Skin Pack, but with the pilot/copilot names updated. On the afternoon of August 19, 1967, Captain Steve Pless and his crew were flying medevac escort near Quang Ngai (south of Chu Lai in I Corps). On the way to a pick-up of wounded ROK Marines, they heard an emergency call on the "Guard" channel from a transport helicopter. It had set down to make repairs on the beach, and was attacked by a large number of VC. Four Americans had been left on the ground when the ship took off, and they were being overrun by the enemy. Determining that the H-34 they were escorting could make the initial medevac pick-up without their support, Pless and his crew decided to respond to the emergency call. As they approached the site they could see the enemy beating and hacking at the four American prisoners. Pless took his gunship into a gun and rocket run, targeting a large group of VC in the clearing. Driving the enemy off with his gun run, Pless landed between the Americans and the enemy. Gunnery Sergeant Poulson jumped out and ran to support the single American still capable of walking. Putting the American on board the aircraft, Poulson, followed by the copilot and other crewman raced to help the other Americans. Determining one of the Americans to be dead, the three crewman began carrying the two injured Americans toward their Huey. At this point the VC attacked and tried to overrun the crew and helicopter. Pulling out their side arms, the crew alternately dragged the injured Americans and fired at oncoming VC. Some of the enemy came within a few feet of their Huey while they were loading the injured aboard. When all were aboard, Pless applied power to his grossly overloaded Huey and took off over the water. The skids of the ship touched the water four times before he finally got the aircraft to gain altitude. Pless jetisoned his rocket pods and ordered the crew to throw out all unnecessary items from the cabin. They landed the injured at Chu Lai First hospital and returned to their base at Ky Ha. The next day Pless and his crew learned that 20 VC dead had been found on the beach with evidence of many more enemy casualties being dragged off. Captain Pless was promoted to Major in September, 1967, and was awarded the Medal of Honor on January 19, 1969. The rest of his crew, Captain Rupert Fairfield, GySgt Leroy Poulson and LCpl John Phelps were all awarded the Navy Cross. The downloads are available at Combat Ace, LOF, and the DCS File Repository. Note that they are also updated to DCS World 1.2.7 at the time of this post.
  7. Here are some screenshots from my skinpack that pays tribute to the Marine squadrons that flew the Huey in Vietnam. Since this is a DCS module of a more modern UH-1 variant (the UH-1H), I have opted to put the flight crew in contemporary uniforms. Note the MARPAT body armor on the door gunners. In chronological order, here is: VMO-2 Angry Two (1966) VMO-6 Tomcats (1967) VMO-3 Scarface (1967) In April 1968, VMO-3 was redesignated as HML-367, and changed their paint jobs accordingly. Another shot of HML-367 with the door gunner getting into the picture. And finally, HML-367 when they returned to Vietnam in 1975 for Operation: Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon. The skin pack requires DCS World (and the UH-1H model to fly), and is available on Combat Ace, LOF, and the DCS File Repository.
  8. This DCS video displays UH-1 skins taken from my Medal of Honor skin pack. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aCMr7X8WFKs The mission apparently also uses my USMC and Seawolves skins as well. I'm kind of stoked at this. Can you tell?
  9. The skins included are: US Army 82nd Medical Detachment (Air Ambulance) US Army 2/17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division US Army 173rd Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Regiment US Army 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (#775) US Army 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (#888) USMC Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6) I have added the names and ranks (at the time) of the pilots and co-pilots of these airframes at the time of the action. While I have attempted to be as accurate as these gentlemen deserve, I may have made some incorrect assumptions (this is especially true about the co-pilots, who are not as easily found in the public record). Likewise, I was unable to accurately represent GySgt Leroy Poulson and LCpl John Phelps of VMO-6, as the door gunner textures do not support it. If you see any inaccuracies, please let me know so that I may correct them. All reference imagery and much of the research was taken from http://vietnam-hueys... Honor page.htm The Airframes and the Medal of Honor Recipients: 82nd Medical Detachment (Air Ambulance) CW3 Michael Novosel - October 2, 1969 CW3 Michael Novosel was pilot-in-command of of a UH-1H med evac Huey with the 82nd Medical Detachment in 1969. On October 2, he went to the assistance of a group of wounded South Vietnamese soldiers that were pinned down by an enemy force concealed in a series of bunkers. Flying without any gunship cover, he made repeated runs against heavy enemy fire to pick up the wounded. Near the end of the action, he spotted a wounded ARVN soldier near an enemy bunker. He maneuvered the ship near the wounded man and a crewman reached down to grab and lift the wounded soldier into the aircraft. During the maneuver the aircraft was hit by enemy fire and CW3 Novosel was wounded. In all, Michael Novosel and his crew made 15 extractions in the face of enemy fire, saving 29 wounded South Vietnamese soldiers. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1971. 2/17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division Sp4 Joseph G. LaPointe - June 2, 1969 Sp4 Joseph "Guy" LaPointe was a medic with Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry. On June 2, 1969, he was just one day from going on leave to meet his wife and new son. However, SP4 LaPointe volunteered for a mission that day because his replacement was a new guy without any field experience. The patrol landed on the top of Hill 376, near the famous "Hamburger Hill" battle site. Sweeping away from the hilltop LZ, the point man walked into a fire zone from concealed enemy bunkers. Two more men were quickly wounded and "Doc" LaPointe moved forward to aid his wounded buddies. He put himself between the enemy bunkers and the wounded, and began working on the wounded. He was soon hit by enemy fire, but ignoring his own wounds he continued to shield his buddies while tending their wounds. He was hit by a second burst of fire and knocked away from his friends. He crawled back to the wounded again and once more shielded them from enemy fire while resuming his aid. This time an enemy grenade landed among the group, mortally wounding them all, including Doc LaPointe. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously on December 16, 1971. 173rd Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Regiment PFC Gary Wetzel - January 8, 1968 PFC (later Sp4c) Gary Wetzel was a door gunner on "Robin Hood 866" in January, 1968. He was nearing the end of his second tour when his helicopter was hit by an enemy RPG rocket while landing in a hot LZ with an insertion team. The grounded helicopter was hit repeatedly by enemy fire and the pilot, Bill Dismukes, was wounded. As PFC Wetzel went to the assistance of his pilot, another enemy rocket impacted the ship just behind the pilot's seat. Wetzel was blown out of the helicopter, suffering severe wounds to his right arm, chest and legs, and his left arm was almost severed from his body - hanging only by a flap of skin. In spite of his multiple wounds, Wetzel climbed back into the damaged ship and took an enemy automatic weapon position under fire with his door gun. The enemy gun had the American troops pinned and Wetzel was able to destroy it with his fire. Wetzel then tried to go to the aid of his pilot again, but passed out from loss of blood. When he regained consciousness, his crew chief was dragging the wounded pilot to the shelter of a nearby dike. Wetzel crawled over and attempted to help the crew chief move the pilot to safety, but passed out a second time. After he and the other survivors were rescued, Wetzel's left arm was amputated and he spent five months in military hospitals recovering from his injuries and infections. Gary Wetzel was awarded the Medal of Honor on November 19, 1968. Two skins from the 229th Aviation Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division: Captain Ed Freeman - November 14, 1965 Captain Ed Freeman served as Second-in-command of A Company, 229th Aviation Battalion in 1965-66. On November 14, 1965, he flew in support of LTC Hal Moore and the 1/7th Cavalry fighting against three battalions of NVA at LZ X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley. Captain Freeman flew 14 missions into the face of enemy fire over the course of the first day to deliver much needed ammo and water, and to evacuate wounded soldiers. He was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions at LZ X-Ray on July 16, 2001. Major Bruce Crandall - November 14, 1965 Major Bruce Crandall was commander of A Company, 229th Aviation Battalion, on November 14, 1965 at LZ X-Ray. With Captain Freeman's ship following him, Major Crandall flew 14 mission into the hot LZ , taking intense enemy fire to deliver supplies and evacuate wounded from the battle. As his ship was damaged by enemy fire (his crew chief was also wounded on one flight), Major Crandall was forced to switch to another aircraft. He flew a total of three different ships in his effort to support the troops at LZ X-Ray. Major Crandall was finally awarded the Medal of Honor on February 26, 2007. And USMC Marine Observation Squadron Six (VMO-6). Captain Stephen Pless, USMC - August 19, 1967 Note: this is the same skin as the one released in my USMC Vietnam Skin Pack, but with the pilot/copilot names updated. On the afternoon of August 19, 1967, Captain Steve Pless and his crew were flying medevac escort near Quang Ngai (south of Chu Lai in I Corps). On the way to a pick-up of wounded ROK Marines, they heard an emergency call on the "Guard" channel from a transport helicopter. It had set down to make repairs on the beach, and was attacked by a large number of VC. Four Americans had been left on the ground when the ship took off, and they were being overrun by the enemy. Determining that the H-34 they were escorting could make the initial medevac pick-up without their support, Pless and his crew decided to respond to the emergency call. As they approached the site they could see the enemy beating and hacking at the four American prisoners. Pless took his gunship into a gun and rocket run, targeting a large group of VC in the clearing. Driving the enemy off with his gun run, Pless landed between the Americans and the enemy. Gunnery Sergeant Poulson jumped out and ran to support the single American still capable of walking. Putting the American on board the aircraft, Poulson, followed by the copilot and other crewman raced to help the other Americans. Determining one of the Americans to be dead, the three crewman began carrying the two injured Americans toward their Huey. At this point the VC attacked and tried to overrun the crew and helicopter. Pulling out their side arms, the crew alternately dragged the injured Americans and fired at oncoming VC. Some of the enemy came within a few feet of their Huey while they were loading the injured aboard. When all were aboard, Pless applied power to his grossly overloaded Huey and took off over the water. The skids of the ship touched the water four times before he finally got the aircraft to gain altitude. Pless jetisoned his rocket pods and ordered the crew to throw out all unnecessary items from the cabin. They landed the injured at Chu Lai First hospital and returned to their base at Ky Ha. The next day Pless and his crew learned that 20 VC dead had been found on the beach with evidence of many more enemy casualties being dragged off. Captain Pless was promoted to Major in September, 1967, and was awarded the Medal of Honor on January 19, 1969. The rest of his crew, Captain Rupert Fairfield, GySgt Leroy Poulson and LCpl John Phelps were all awarded the Navy Cross. The downloads are available at Combat Ace, as well as the DCS File Repository (pending approval).