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This Day in WWII 24 August 1940 - 1945


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#1 Donster

Donster

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:10 AM

Posted Image Frigidaire Ad - August 1943

1940: The Luftwaffe begins a new phase in its offensive by sending over a higher proportion of fighters to bombers, in an effort to keep losses down. The unofficial start of the Blitz on London begins with a lost formation of German bombers mistakenly dropping their bombs over the capital, damaging St. Giles and Cripplegate.

1940: The German battleship Bismarck is commissioned.

Posted Image *Loretta Young

1941: Russians counter-attack in the Gomel sector. Heavy Romanian losses around Odessa.

1941: Churchill broadcasts and warns Japan that its aggression must stop.

1941: The U.S. government declares the cosmetics industry nonessential, and the metal and plastic used for lipstick containers and compacts are earmarked for military use.

Posted Image Loretta Young

1942: The Russians launch a new offensive in Leningrad area. Stalin orders that the city of Stalingrad is to be held at all costs and sends Marshal Zhukov to supervise its defense.

1942: Battle joined in the Eastern Solomons with the Japanese trying to land reinforcements on Guadalcanal. US forces beat off the Japanese Combined Fleet sinking the carrier Ryujo, but suffering damage to the carrier Enterprise.

Posted Image Loretta Young

1943: A blanket of smoke covers Berlin to a height of 20,000ft. The first estimates put German dead at 5,860 after last night’s raid.

1943: Himmler, becomes the Minister of the Interior.

Posted Image Florida Citrus Commision Ad - August 1944

1944: The Germans stage comeback in Paris, with fierce fighting reported. Bordeaux is evacuated by German troops who occupy fortified bunker positions on the Gironde west of the city.

1944: Malinovsky and Tolbuklin link up to encircle 20 divisions of the German 6th and 8th Army's in the area of Kishinevin in Romania.

Posted Image Loretta Young

1945: The Japanese news agency says that all Japanese troops are to be out of the U.S. landing area by tomorrow.

Posted Image Loretta Young

*Loretta Young was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on January 6, 1913. Her parents separated when Loretta was three years old. Her mother moved Loretta and her two older sisters to Southern California, where Mrs. Young ran a boarding house. Mrs. Young's brother-in-law was an assistant director and got young Loretta a small role in the film "The Only Way" (1914). The role consisted of nothing more than a small, weeping child lying on an operating table. Later that year, she appeared in another small role in "The Primrose Ring" (1917). The film starred Mae Murray, who was so taken with little Loretta that she offered to adopt her. Loretta lived with the Murrays for about a year and a half. In 1921, she had a brief scene in "The Sheik" (1921).

Loretta and her sisters attended parochial schools, after which they helped their mother run the boarding house. In 1927, Loretta returned to films in a small part in "Naughty But Nice" (1927). Even at the age of fourteen, she was an ambitious actress. Beginning with her role as Denise Laverne in "The Magnificent Flirt" (1928), she shaped any character she took on with total dedication. In 1928, she received second billing in "The Head Man" (1928) and continued to toil in many roles throughout the 20s and 30s, making anywhere from six to nine films a year. Her two sisters were also actresses but were not as successful as Loretta, whose natural beauty was her distinct advantage. By the mid-30's, Loretta left First National Studios for rival Fox, where she had previously worked on a loan-out basis. Loretta became one of the premiere leading ladies of Hollywood. In 1938, Loretta starred as Sally Goodwin in "Kentucky" (1938), an outstanding success. Her co-star Walter Brennan won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Peter Goodwin.

By the 1940's, Loretta was still one of the most beautiful ladies in Hollywood. She reached the pinnacle of her career when she won the Academy Award for Best Actress in "The Farmer's Daughter" (1947), the tale of a farm girl who rises through the ranks and becomes a congresswoman. It was a smash and today is her best remembered film. The same year, she starred in the delightful fantasy "The Bishop's Wife" (1947) with David Niven and Cary Grant. It was another box office success and continues to be a TV staple during the holiday season. In 1949, Loretta starred in the well-received film, "Mother Is a Freshman" (1949) with Van Johnson and Rudy Vallee and "Come to the Stable" (1949). The latter garnered Loretta her second Oscar nomination, but she lost to Olivia de Havilland in "The Heiress" (1949). In 1953, Loretta made "It Happens Every Thursday" (1953), which was to be her final big screen role.

Young hosted and starred in the well-received half hour anthology series "The Loretta Young Show". It ran from 1953 to 1961. Her trademark was to appear dramatically at the beginning in various high fashion evening gowns. She returned at the program's conclusion to offer a brief passage from the Bible, or a famous quote, that reflected upon the evening's story. (Young's introductions and conclusions to her television shows were not rerun on television because she legally stipulated that they not be; she did not want the dresses she wore in those segments to "date" the program.) Her program ran in prime time on NBC for eight years, the longest-running prime-time network program hosted by a woman up to that time.


Posted Image Loretta Young

The program, which earned her three Emmys, was based on the premise that each drama was in answer to a question asked in her fan mail. The program's original title was "Letter to Loretta". The title was changed to "The Loretta Young Show" during the first season (as of the February 14, 1954 episode), and the "letter" concept was dropped at the end of the second season. At this time, Young's hospitalization, due to overwork towards the end of the second season, required that there be a number of guest hosts and guest stars; her first appearance in the 1955–56 season was for the Christmas show. From then on, Young appeared in only about half of each season's shows as an actress, and served as the program's host for the remainder. Minus Young's introductions and conclusions, the series was rerun as the "Loretta Young Theatre" in daytime by NBC from 1960 to 1964. It also appeared in syndication into the early 1970s, before being withdrawn. In the 1990s, selected episodes from Loretta's personal collection, with the opening and closing segments (and original title) intact, were released on home video, and frequently shown on cable television.

In the 1962–1963 television season, Young appeared as Christine Massey, a free-lance magazine writer and mother of seven children, in CBS's "The New Loretta Young Show". It fared poorly in the ratings on Monday evenings against ABC's Ben Casey. It was dropped after twenty-six weeks. Dack Rambo, later a co-star of CBS's Dallas, appeared as one of her twin sons in the series.

Young was married to actor Grant Withers from 1930 to 1931. After that she was involved in affairs with Spencer Tracy and Clark Gable and in 1935 had their child, a daughter. She married producer Tom Lewis in 1940 and they divorced very bitterly in the mid 1960s. Lewis died in 1988. They had two sons, Peter Lewis (of the legendary San Francisco rock band Moby Grape), and Christopher Lewis, a film director.

She married fashion designer Jean Louis in 1993. Louis died in 1997.

For the next 24 years, Loretta did not appear in any entertainment medium. Her final performance was in a made for TV film "Lady in the Corner" (1989) (TV). She lived a quiet retirement in Palm Springs, California until her death on August 12, 2000 from ovarian cancer at the home of her sister Georgiana and Georgiana's husband, Ricardo Montalban.


Posted Image Pullman Ad - August 1944
"Work, work, work, work, work, work, work, work, work, work....."