Gunny

In accordance with the Continental Marine Act of 1775, the 2nd Continental Congress decreed

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That two battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one Colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, two majors and other officers, as usual in other regiments; that they consist of an equal number of privates as with other battalions, that particular care be taken that no persons be appointed to offices, or enlisted into said battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve for and during the present war with Great Britain and the Colonies; unless dismissed by Congress; that they be distinguished by the names of the First and Second Battalions of Marines.

 

Two hundred and forty two years ago.  Marine Corps birthday, best day of the year.  Better than Christmas

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Happy Birthday to the United States Marine Corps! God Bless every one that serves and has served.

And it's good to see you stop by Gunny! :thumbsup:

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And shortly thereafter the enlisted Marines began telling their "good" officers to start wearing a knotted rope on their caps . . . so said officers wouldn't "accidentally" get shot by a Marine firing from a ship's upper works.

Of course, that gambit failed when all the "other" officers took to wearing the rope on their caps.

All kidding aside (you're sure I was kidding, right?) here's to the US Marine Corps. 

OG

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Well, he's partly kidding.  Maybe.  That is the reason officers started wearing knotted rope on their covers.  Did it work?  Sometimes?  Maybe?

 

Donnie, I'm around.  Always watching Donster, always watching.

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Happy Birthday, Gunny!

 

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Gunny still celebrates Birthdays? I didn't know he could count that high!!

All kidding aside, Gunny, have a superb Birthday and may there be many more to come.

SEMPER FI, Marine!

( My grandson is now a full-fledged Marine, and I couldn't be more proud!!!)

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Donnie, I'm around.  Always watching Donster, always watching.

:sofa1:

 

Doing some research on my late Uncle Harley's Marine Corps service, having known he fought in the Pacific Theater during WWII but not exactly what campaigns. Found out he participated in a number of major campaigns during the war which included Guadalcanal, New Georgia, Bougainville, Guam and Okinawa. And that Uncle Harley was one of six survivors from his original unit. He also went to Korea shortly after the Japanese surrender to help oversee the surrender of Japanese troops.

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18 hours ago, Gunny said:

That two battalions of Marines be raised consisting of one Colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, two majors and other officers, as usual in other regiments; that they consist of an equal number of privates as with other battalions, that particular care be taken that no persons be appointed to offices, or enlisted into said battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve for and during the present war with Great Britain and the Colonies; unless dismissed by Congress; that they be distinguished by the names of the First and Second Battalions of Marines.

 

Two hundred and forty two years ago.  Marine Corps birthday, best day of the year.  Better than Christmas

A very happy birthday wish to our United States Marine Corps, a department of the U.S. Navy... the men's department it is.

Gunny, how 'bout you hang around here a bit more?  Bring a little life back to the halls of CSim.

 

 

11 hours ago, Whizkid said:

Gunny still celebrates Birthdays? I didn't know he could count that high!!

All kidding aside, Gunny, have a superb Birthday and may there be many more to come.

SEMPER FI, Marine!

( My grandson is now a full-fledged Marine, and I couldn't be more proud!!!)

Congratulations, Whiz and to your grandson!

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4 hours ago, Stans said:

A very happy birthday wish to our United States Marine Corps, a department of the U.S. Navy... the men's department it is.

Gunny, how 'bout you hang around here a bit more?  Bring a little life back to the halls of CSim.

 

 

Congratulations, Whiz and to your grandson!

Thanks, Stans. He elected to be trained as an Ordnance Specialist, (they load bombs, etc, on the Carrier a/c), so what does the Corps do, they send him to San Diego peeling spuds on board a half-sized Carrier! He's mad as hell, but I think that's just a step to his real job, so I told him to suck it up and look for better things to come. 19yr olds! Sheesh!

Second that re. Gunny sticking around. Who else can we cower under?

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Whiz, you need to tell that young lad that EVERY young private and PFC get to do mess duty when they deploy aboard ship.  And that half-sized carrier is one of the most advanced projection of force ever devised.  Carrying a battalion of Marines plus all their support to INCLUDE the air support.  He's lucky, he could have been deployed to an LPD or LSD.  Smaller and older.

 

Cower behind me?  We get in a fight every man-jack of you lot will standing to or I'll shoot you myself and use your corpses to build a bunker.

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Record research can provide surprises.

In the process of finding information about my Mom's last husband, who I detested, I discovered that he actually served in Burma during WW2 and was with Merrill's Marauders during their several-month operation behind Japanese lines.  He was wounded during that op.  I don't know exactly what happened to him but he did receive VA disability benefits for the effects of the wound.  Imagine my surprise . . .

He was still an ass, no matter what he did during the war.

But I honor his service.  I wish the lying bastard had been more forthcoming when he was married to Mom.  

OG 

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Whiz, listen to Gunny.  I was thinking that such a duty might just be part of a weed out program, separate those who will accept and perform even the most menial of tasks without complaint versus those who are not willing to do whatever is required of them.  I know this happens in the civilian world, I've had people quit just because they thought a duty that I assigned to them was beneath them.  Those are not the people I want working in my office, I'm looking for dedication and I never assign a duty that I have not nor am willing to perform.

Old Guy, perhaps your step-father's assery might have been a result of his combat experience?  PTSD was not something that was talked about nor treated much until after the war in Vietnam. 

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It's not so much a weed-out program as a "learn your place, follow orders, and suck it up and we'll give you more privileges when you complete your rite of passage" program.  That's been part of the military tradition forever.  It's not so much to treat the junior guys like garbage, but rather because 1) the job needs to be done, which means that 2) somebody has to do it, and 3) the more senior guys have already done it so it's the junior guys' turn.  The net effect is when he's done with his mess cranking duties, he'll actually be grateful to be working in the ordinance shop!

I was the first lieutenant in my squadron, so I had all the junior guys who fit that bill.  I used to send them to their shops to learn their rate as a reward for a good job.  It sounds kind of sick and twisted (you did so well, so go do more work), but the troops are grateful and it's a win-win.

 

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I have a picture of my Dad kneeling beside a truck tire.  He's holding a tire iron.  He was also a master sergeant at the time (late 1944 in Belgium). 

When he showed me the pic he said, "You realize that is a posed picture."

"What do you mean?"

He laughed.  "Master sergeants don't change tires.  That's what PFCs are for."

:) OG

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19 hours ago, Old Guy said:

I have a picture of my Dad kneeling beside a truck tire.  He's holding a tire iron.  He was also a master sergeant at the time (late 1944 in Belgium). 

When he showed me the pic he said, "You realize that is a posed picture."

"What do you mean?"

He laughed.  "Master sergeants don't change tires.  That's what PFCs are for."

:) OG

:lol:

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