Jump to content
COMBATSIM Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Donster

This Month in the Korean War: July 1950-1953

Recommended Posts

Magnavox1952.jpgMagnavox Ad - 1952

July 1, 1950: First U.S. infantry unit arrives in Korea:  Two reinforced rifle companies of the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division.  Along with Battery A of the 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, it comprises Task Force Smith.
July 2, 1950: Off Chumunjin, on Korea's east coast, the USS Juneau, HMS Jamaica and HMS Black Swan destroy three of four attacking North Korean torpedo boats.
July 2, 1950: General Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief, Far East (CinCFE) requests the immediate dispatch of a Marine Corps Regimental Combat Team with its own air support for immediate duty in Korea.
July 3, 1950: In the vicinity of Pyongyang, Navy fighters of Fighter Squadron 51 shoot down two North Korean YAK-9s, naval aviation's first kills of the Korean War.
July 5, 1950: Battle of Osan.  First U.S. ground action of the war: Task Force Smith (406 infantrymen and 134 artillerymen) engages and delays advancing North Korean People's Army (NKPA) units.

 

DawnAddams1.jpgDawn Adams


July 6, 1950: Fifty-seven nurses arrive in Pusan, Korea.  They helped establish a hospital for the wounded.  Two days later, on July 8, 12 Army nurses moved forward with a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH) to Taejon.
July 7, 1950: The Security Council of the United Nations passes a resolution recommending a unified command in Korea and asking the United States to name the commander.
July 7, 1950: The First Provisional Marine Brigade is activated at Camp Pendleton, California under the command of Brigadier General Edward A. Craig, USMC.  The basic components of the 6,500-man brigade are the 5th Marines; 1st Battalion, 11th Marines; and the Marine Aircraft Group 33 (MAG-33).  The Brigade subsequently arrives 2 August at Pusan, Korea.
July 8, 1950: President Truman designates the CINC/Far East Command, General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, as the commander of the United Nations Command.
July 8-12, 1950: 21st Infantry stalls NKPA advances at Chochiwon.

 

38thParallel.jpg


July 11, 1950: Sailors and Marines from USS Juneau land near Kashin, North Korea and destroy a railroad tunnel with explosives.
July 12-18, 1950: 25th Infantry and 1st Cavalry Divisions begin movement to Korea from Japan; 29th Regimental Combat Team sails from Okinawa for Korea; 2d Infantry Division prepares to embark from Seattle.
July 13-16, 1950: 19th and 34th Infantry Regiments, 24th Infantry Division, fight delaying actions at Kum River line.
July 14, 1950: President Rhee places all ROK forces under operational control of CINC/United Nations Command.
July 19, 1950: President Harry S. Truman authorizes the Department of Defense to call up reserve units and individual reservists.  On the following day (July 20, 1950), the Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Clifton B. Cates, orders organized Marine Corps ground reserve units to active duty, along with a partial call up of Marine air reservists and squadrons.
July 19-20, 1950: Battle of Taejon.  KPA defeats 24th Infantry Division and captures town.

 

DawnAddams2.jpgDawn Adams


July 25, 1950: The Commandant of the Marine Corps directs that the entire 1st Marine Division be brought to full war-time strength and embark between August 10-15 for duty in Korea.  Marine aviation elements in the Far East were also increased from a single group to a wing.
July 25, 1950: 29th Regiment engages the enemy near Chinju.
July 31, 1950: 5th Regimental Combat Team arrives in Korea from Hawaii.

 

korea1953.jpg

 

July 10, 1951: Armistice talks begin at Kaesong.

 

DawnAddams3.jpgDawn Adams

 

July 17 - August 4, 1952: First Battle for Old Baldy (Hill 266) fought by the 2nd Infantry Division.  The battle marks the start of the communist tactic of attacking Eighth Army's outpost line of resistance in order to inflict casualties.  The Objective is to pressure UN armistice negotiators and is the communist response to the UNC air pressure campaign against North Korea.

July 6-10, 1953: Battle of Pork Chop Hill.  After five days of fighting, The 7th Infantry Division is ordered to evacuate its defensive positions by LTG Maxwell D. Taylor.  Taylor viewed the heavy casualties taken in the defense of Pork Chop Hill as overly "prohibitive" in the face of repeated Chinese assaults.
July 7-8, 1953: Combat outposts Berlin and East Berlin, in the 7th Marine Regiment's right sector, come under heavy attack during the Marine relief of the U.S. Army's 25th Infantry Division.
July 11, 1953: Major John F. Bolt, from the Marine Fighter Squadron 115 (VMF-115) becomes the Marine Corps' first "ace" with kills of his fifth and sixth MiGs.

 

DawnAddams4.jpgDawn Adams


July 13-27, 1953: Battle of Kumsong River Salient. Last Communist offensive. CCF launch a six division attack partly largely directed at ROK forces because of the Republic of Korea's refusal to participate in the peace negotiations. CCF forces used superior firepower and overwhelming force to break the salient and destroy the elite ROK "White Tiger" regiment. Fighting continued in the area until the signing of the Armistice on July 27.
July 16, 1953: Lieutenant Guy P. Bordelon Jr. becomes the Navy's one "ace" of the war when the shore-based naval aviator, in a nighttime engagement, shoots down his fifth enemy plane.
July 24-26, 1953: Final U.S. ground combat. Heavy enemy (3,000 men) attack is launched in the Berlin Complex ("Boulder City") area held by the 7th and 1st Marine Regiments. Last Marine ground actions of the war are fought on Hills 111 and 119.
July 27, 1953: Last air-kill of the war. F-86 pilot downs an enemy transport near the Manchurian border.
July 27, 1953: At 10:00 am, the United States, North Korea and China sign an armistice, which ends the war but fails to bring about a permanent peace.  All fighting stops twelve hours later; both sides have three days to withdraw two kilometers from the cease-fire line. To date, the Republic of Korea (South) and Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea (North) have not signed a peace treaty.

 

us-marine-captures-north-koreans.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Donster said:

July 27, 1953: At 10:00 am, the United States, North Korea and China sign an armistice, which ends the war but fails to bring about a permanent peace.  All fighting stops twelve hours later; both sides have three days to withdraw two kilometers from the cease-fire line. To date, the Republic of Korea (South) and Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea (North) have not signed a peace treaty.

And to this day nothing has changed.  The two Koreas are still in a state of war and in a cease fire which has lasted 65 years.  The promise of peace may be slipping away as it has been found that North Korea has recently ramped up their development of ballistic missiles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The American media may lose this battle for the world just as they did the Vietnam War. By all the negative coverage of President Trump, and the allegations that he will be impeached, Kim may feel that Trump may not be around for long and ignore any verbal agreement he had with Trump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Donster said:

The American media may lose this battle for the world just as they did the Vietnam War. By all the negative coverage of President Trump, and the allegations that he will be impeached, Kim may feel that Trump may not be around for long and ignore any verbal agreement he had with Trump.

 

Two things here.  First, I expect your analysis is correct.  Second, N. Korea has a long history of making agreements, then breaking them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Two things here.  First, I expect your analysis is correct.  Second, N. Korea has a long history of making agreements, then breaking them.

Yep. Kim is much like my ex-wife! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×