Jump to content
COMBATSIM Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Donster

This Day in WWII 9 July 1940 - 1944

Recommended Posts

FloridaCitrusCommission-July1943.jpgFlorida Citrus Commission Ad - July 1943

 

1940: Commons passed War Credits of £1,000,000,000. Tea rationing of 2oz per head per week introduced in Britain.

 

1940: RAF begins night bombing of Germany.

 

Paulette%20Goddard1.jpg *Paulette Goddard

 

1940: The British submarine Salmon is lost south-west of Stavanger, Norway. The German raider Komet leaves Bergen in Norway for operations in the Pacific via the Northwest Passage in the Arctic Ocean assisted by Russian icebreakers.

 

1940: The British and Italian fleets make contact at Battle of Cape Spartivento. The British force includes 1 Aircraft Carrier and 3 Battleships, while the Italian squadron under Admiral Campioni consists of 2 Battleships, 6 heavy and 12 light cruisers. The Italians brake off contact after their flag ship Giulio Cesare is hit and damaged, although they still claim a naval victory.

 

Paulette%20Goddard2.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

1941: Panzer Group 3 defeats Russian blocking forces and capture Vitebsk.

 

1941: General Dentz sues for peace in the Middle East.

 

Paulette%20Goddard3.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

1942: Anne Frank and her family go into hiding in the attic above her father's office in an Amsterdam warehouse.

 

1942: Renewed German attacks against the British defenses at El Alamein bog down in the face of stubborn British resistance.

 

FisherBodyAd-July1943.jpg Fisher Body Ad - July 1943

 

1943: Operation 'Husky' begins, with the US 82nd and the British 1st Airborne Divisions making the first landings on Sicily at night. However, due to navigational errors, hundreds of U.S. paratroopers are dropped in the sea and are drowned, while many others are widely scattered and miss their assigned targets.

 

1943: The Russians say that the German attack at Kursk has been held and claim that 2,000 tanks have been destroyed in four days.

 

1943: At least 12 die as a German hit and run bomber hits East Grinstead cinema during an afternoon performance.

 

Paulette%20Goddard4.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

1944: Units of the British Second Army enter Caen which has been reduced to a heap of rubble due to the preceding heavy aerial and artillery bombardments by the British. U.S. XIX Corps begins its push for St. Lo. (WATCH BRITISH NEWSREEL)

 

1944: A major Russian offensive begins towards Rezekne, to the East of Riga in order to cut off Army Group North in Baltic States. The 2nd Belorussian Front attacks northwest from Vitebsk, the 3rd Belorussian Front attacks West from Psovsk and the Leningrad Front attacks southwest toward Narva.

 

Paulette%20Goddard5.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

1944: All Japanese resistance in the Ukhrul area on India-Burma border crushed by the British.

 

1944: U.S. Marines defeat the Japanese on Saipan after a final Banzai charge. 27,000 Japanese and 3,116 Americans were killed on Saipan. (WATCH U.S. NEWSREEL)

 

Paulette%20Goddard6.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

*Pauline Marion Goddard Levy was born in Whitestone Landing, New York, on 3 June 1910. She was a beautiful child who began to model for local department stores before she made her debut with Florenz Ziegfeld's Follies at the age of 13. For three years, she astounded audiences with her talent.

She married Edgar James when she was 15, but the union was doomed to failure and was dissolved in 1930. By then, Paulette had begun to make her mark on Hollywood with a small bit appearance in the film "Berth Marks" (1929). Her age (19) didn't help her in getting better parts. She would continue in bit roles in films such as "The Girl Habit" (1931), "The Mouthpiece" (1932), and "Young Ironsides" (1932). For the next four years she searched for parts but came up empty-handed. It wasn't until 1936 that Paulette would again appear in a motion picture, in "Modern Times" (1936). Once again she found herself with a bit part. Finally, after ten years, she gained a decent part in "The Women" (1939), and Paulette thought that maybe her career was finally taking off. In her next film, she played Joyce Norman in "The Cat and the Canary" (1939), which was intended to be a send-off vehicle for Bob Hope. It not only did that, but it also established Paulette as a genuine star. Her performance won her a ten-year contract with Paramount Studios, which was one of the premier studios of the day.

 

Her next feature film was with the great Fred Astaire in the acclaimed musical "Second Chorus" (1940). Later that year, she once again teamed up with Bob Hope for the film "The Ghost Breakers" (1940), and once again the movie was a huge hit. This was just the beginning because the 1940s was the decade that kept her busy and in the American moviegoing public's eyes. Motion pictures such as "The Great Dictator" (1940) with husband Charles Chaplin, "Pot o' Gold" (1941), and "The Lady Has Plans" (1942) were added to her already sparkling resume.

 

Paulette%20Goddard7.jpg Paulette Goddard

 

In 1943, Paulette was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in the film "So Proudly We Hail!" (1943)! She didn't win, but it solidified her as a top draw. Although "Standing Room Only" (1944) with Fred MacMurray didn't bring in the crowds at the box office, the production is still remembered as a delightful comedy, a must-see for any film buff. Paulette reached the pinnacle of her career in Mitchell Leisen's "Kitty" (1945). The film was a hit with moviegoers, as Paulette played an ordinary English woman transformed into a duchess. The film was filled with plenty of comedy, dramatic and romantic scenes that appealed to virtually everyone. As Abby Hale in "Unconquered" (1947), Paulette once more found herself with a profit-making flick. This Cecil B. DeMille film paired her with Gary Cooper in an 18th century romantic drama. The critics weren't too keen on it, but the public could not have cared less. They loved this long-running (146 minutes) movie.

 

The 1950s were not too good for Paulette's career, as she appeared in only six feature films, the last being "Charge of the Lancers" (1954). She would not be seen again on the silver screen until in "Gli indifferenti" (1964). Her career was just about finished, although she did appear in a made-for-TV film called "The Snoop Sisters" (1972) (TV) as Norma Treet. That one was forgettable, and Paulette retired from the film world for good. On 23 April 1990, she died of massive heart failure in Ronco, Switzerland, at the age of 79.

 

TRIVIA:

Measurements: 34-24 1/2-34 (measured in January 1941) (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine).

Height: 5' 4" (1.63 m)

Spouse:

Erich Maria Remarque (25 February 1958 - 25 September 1970) (his death)

Burgess Meredith (21 May 1944 - 8 June 1949) (divorced)

Charles Chaplin (June 1936 - June 1942) (divorced)

Edgar James (1927 - 1931) (divorced)

Was the leading contender for the role of Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939). Her inability to produce a marriage certificate to prove she and Charles Chaplin were married, and the appearance of Vivien Leigh on the scene, lost her the part.

She suffered a miscarriage in October 1944 while married to Burgess Meredith.

Had no siblings and no children.

Goddard never had any children, but she became a stepmother to Charles Chaplin's two sons, Charles Chaplin Jr. and Sydney Chaplin, while she and Charlie were married. In his memoirs, "My Father Charlie Chaplin," from 1960, Charles Jr. describes her as a lovely, caring and intelligent woman throughout the book.

Sources variously cite her year of birth as 1911 and 1914, and the place as Whitestone Landing, New York, USA. However, municipal employees in Ronco, Switzerland, where she died, gave her birth year of record as 1905.

 

Pontiac-July1945.jpg Pontiac Ad - July 1945

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×