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  1. Yesterday
  2. Old Guy

    Odd errors

    I figured it might be a javascript issue. I don't even have JS on my PC. Haven't for a year or more. At first I ran across a fair number of sites with videos I couldn't play, but that number has decreased to practically nothing lately. The Web in general has moved to other formats. The reading I've done over the last week or so about aviation triggered memories of my ATC days. The language of air traffic control is called "phraseology" and it is highly structured, partly because radio communications were uncertain in the early days and partly to make instructions clear to non-English speaking pilots by requiring certain words to be used to describe very specific actions. For instance, when a pilot request landing at an airfield, he will usually know the active runway by listening to airport information regularly broadcast on a separate channel or by simply listening to the tower frequency for a short while before reporting in. He would call using his aircraft N-number (boldly painted on the wings and tail) or using his company callsign or assigned military callsign. Civil aircraft would be N12345, for example, a civil air carrier would be something like United 345 (written as UA345), and a Navy F-14 might be Flyboy 34 or some other designation. The military also uses simple callsigns like Army 12345, the numbers being those painted on the aircraft. There are odd exceptions. BOAC flight 567 was known as Speedbird 567, for reasons related to their early adoption of jet aircraft. Whether that's still the case or not, I don't know. Back in the Cold War days SR-71 flights were not contacted at all, but merely tracked by radar across the country. If you had to contact a Blackbird it was an emergency. I only had to do it once. Sample landing phraseology: "Vinh Long Tower, Stingray 6 is a flight of two Cobras ten miles south for landing." "Stingray 6, Vinh Long, enter left base runway 24, altimeter 3-0-0-2, report base." (we almost always had aircraft enter the traffic pattern on downwind or base, unless they were in position to make a straight-in approach to the active runway. In that case we had them come straight-in unless we had too much traffic to allow that.) "Roger, Ving Long, altimeter 3-0-0-2." (Once the controller has give the local altimeter and the pilot acknowledged it, he would only repeat it if it changed during the approach) "Vinh Long, Stingray 6 on base." "Stingray 6, in sight, you're number two behind the C-47 on final." (If the plane had retractable gear, the controller would ask for a report of "gear down". The Cobra's gear is, of course, down and welded.) "Stingray 6 has the Gooney in sight." "Stingray 6, cleared to land runway 24." (The first airplane has landed and cleared the runway, so Cobra 6 can be cleared to land) "Stingray 6, roger." Although Stingray is a flight of two the flight is handled as a single aircraft. The pilots in a flight are responsible for their own separation at all times, even during landing. This is a normal feature of military flying and is known as MARSA (Military Assumes Responsibility for Separation of Aircraft). Controllers and pilots were both known to use non-standard phraseology. The correct method for vectoring an aircraft to a navigational aid went something like this: "United 345 fly heading 270 until receiving the Farmington VOR then proceed direct Farmington and flight plan route." Actual language: "United 270 fly heading 270 to Farmington, then proceed direct." Everything else was understood by both parties. Nevertheless, if you used that example during your periodic evaluation you'd get a slap on the wrist. Jeez. Old memories. Sorry for running on. OG
  3. Stans, I'd argue that one can watch their videos for the combat simming eye candy and the lols alone. Vicarious combat simming for the CPU and graphics card challenged, so to speak. Also, I'm with you in the lack-of-time group, so I just consume their videos in short sessions when I have some time. YouTube seems to remember where I left off, so that helps.
  4. Donster

    Saturday

    I'm sure!
  5. Donster

    Friday

    And rolling papers!
  6. Pretty damn sweet! Thanks for sharing Dude!
  7. Stans

    Saturday

    Better thee than me.
  8. Donster

    Saturday

    Snowfall has finally finished up. Early snowfall total for Cedar Rapids is 5 inches.
  9. Stans

    Saturday

    Morning y'all, overcast skies and 41F. Expecting a cloudy day, showers developing in the afternoon, becoming a steady rain overnight. Temperatures will rise through the day, today's high of 55F occurring at midnight. Temperatures will peak around 58F tomorrow morning, then begin to fall. Fortunately, the rain is expected to stop and winds will pick up tomorrow afternoon when the temperature is in the mid to upper 40's. The winds will dry much of the rain water before temperatures fall below freezing tomorrow night. Basically, we dodged a winter storm.
  10. Looks like fun. Sadly, I certainly don't have a computer with sufficient horsepower for that sort of thing nor do I have much time for such things. Things sure happen a lot faster in jets than they do with piston engined aircraft.
  11. Stans

    Friday

    Yep, government is still in a shutdown. Oh, and don't forget to buy toilet paper.
  12. Donster

    Saturday

    Morning all. Overcast, snowing and 18F with 1F wind chill. Snow ends by mid-morning. Areas of blowing and drifting snow. Winds out of the N at 15-25 MPH with gusts up to 40 MPH. High of 18F.
  13. Packard Ad - January 1943 1941: Hitler and Mussolini meet at Berchtesgaden, with Mussolini accepting German military help in North Africa, but not Albania. 1941: British launch counteroffensive in East Africa, attacking Eritrea and Ethiopia from Sudan. *Piper Laurie 1942: Two Axis transports, the Mongevino and Ankara land 45 German tanks at Benghazi as reinforcement, while axis forces evacuate the city. 1942: General Wavell warns Churchill that Singapore cannot be held as little had been done to prepare the landward facing defenses. Churchill replies that Singapore must be defended and that 'no question of surrender be entertained until after protracted fighting among the ruins of Singapore city'. General Wavell orders General Percival to prepare Singapore Island for a siege. Japanese troop capture Tavoy as their advance continues in Burma. 1942: The Japanese have now secured all of British North Borneo. Piper Laurie 1943: Russians claim further victories during a 75-mile advance towards Kharkov on the Voronezh front, with the Russians claiming 52,000 axis prisoners on this front alone. 1943: The Eighth Army captures Homs and Tarhuna, near Tripoli. Piper Laurie 1944: The Eire government announces the arrest of two 'Quisling' Irishmen, parachuted into County Clare by German planes. 1944: Germans forces are surrounded in Novgorod, 100 miles to the South of Leningrad, but manage to break out. Piper Laurie 1945: Hitler orders that all divisional sized and larger attacks, or retreats must have his approval. 1945: The Russians cross 1939 Poland-Silesia frontier taking Kracow. East Prussia is also entered from south by Russian troops. Red Army forces capture Lodz. 1945: USAAF B29 bombers destroy the Kawasaki aircraft works near Kobe, in Japan. Piper Laurie *Piper Laurie was born Rosetta Jacobs in Detroit, Michigan, on January 22, 1932, the daughter of a Polish immigrant and his Russian-American wife. Her father was a furniture dealer who moved his family to Los Angeles, California, when she was 6-years-old. Rosetta was a pretty red-haired little girl, but very shy, so her parents sent her to weekly elocution lessons. In addition to her lessons in Hebrew school, she studied acting at a local acting school, and this eventually led to work at Universal Studios. Universal had signed her as a contract player when she was only 17-years-old, and changed her screen name to Piper Laurie. She was cast in the movie "Louisa" (1950), and became very close friends with her costar, Ronald Reagan. She was then cast in "Francis Goes to the Races" (1951) with Donald O'Connor, "Son of Ali Baba" (1952) with Tony Curtis, and "Ain't Misbehavin'" (1955) with Rory Calhoun. The studio tried to enhance her image as an ingenue with press releases stating that she took milk baths and ate gardenia petals for lunch. Although she was making $2,000 per week, her lack of any substantial roles discouraged her so much that by 1955 when she received another script for a Western and "another silly part in a silly movie", she dropped the script in the fireplace, called her agent and told him she didn't care if they fired her, jailed her or sued her. Piper Laurie From there, she went to New York City to study acting, and worked in live television, starring in The Hallmark Hall of Fame version of "Twelfth Night" (1957), "The Days of Wine and Roses" (1958) with Cliff Robertson, which debuted on Playhouse 90 on October 2, and as Kirsten in the Playhouse 90 version of "Winterset" (1959). In 1961, she got the part of Paul Newman's crippled girlfriend in the classic film, "The Hustler" (1961). She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for that role of Sarah Packard. That same year, she was interviewed by a writer/reporter for the New York Herald Tribune, Joe Morgenstern. She liked his casual dress and lifestyle, and 9 months later, they were married. When she did not receive any substantial acting offers after "The Hustler", she retreated with her husband to Woodstock, New York, where she pursued domestic activities such as baking (her grandfather's trade) and raising her only daughter, Anne, born in 1971. In 1976, she accepted the role of Margaret White, the eccentric religious zealot mother of a shy young psychic girl named "Carrie" (1976), played by Sissy Spacek. Piper received her second supporting Oscar nomination for this role. She and her husband divorced in 1981, she moved to Southern California and obtained many film and television roles. She got a third Oscar nomination for her role as Mrs. Norman in "Children of a Lesser God" (1986), and won an Emmy that same year for her acting in "Hallmark Hall of Fame: Promise" (1986), a television movie with James Garner and James Woods. She has appeared in more than 60 films, from 1950 to the present. Ms. Laurie has appeared in many outstanding television shows from "The Best of Broadway" in 1954, to roles on "Playhouse 90" in 1956, roles on "St. Elsewhere" (1982), "Murder, She Wrote" (1984), "Matlock" (1986), "Beauty and the Beast" (1987), "ER" (1994), "Diagnosis Murder" (1993) and "Frasier" (1993). Her daughter, Anne Grace, has made her a grandmother, and though she lives in Southern California, she frequently visits her daughter in New York. TRIVIA: Measurements: 36-25-36 (in 1953), (Source: Celebrity Sleuth magazine). Height: 5' 4 1/2" (1.64 m) De Soto Ad - January 1944
  14. il2crashesnfails

    pilots bailing out under fire

    Volume 2
  15. If you love combat sims (and I know you do) subscribe to the Grim Reapers YouTube channel: (Be sure to watch in full-screen mode for maximum awesomeness)
  16. The Dude

    Odd errors

    OG, I agree that Cap didn't do your version of the Overhead pattern in that video I posted, but he does come closer to your version in some of his other mission videos. Regardless, I'm enjoying this thread immensely because the perspective you bring, as a former military ATC, is both educational and downright fascinating. Re vidoes: If you have JavaScript disabled in your browser, then yeah, the videos won't play in this forum. You will, however, still see the video embed box, but it will contain a message asking you to enable JavaScript if you want to see the video.
  17. Old Guy

    Odd errors

    Amazing what a bit of research will do. I did some searching on "overhead approaches" and discovered that even military pilots disagree on exactly what that is. Current practice seems to be to fly a short upwind, fairly close to the active runway, followed by a hard 180 deg turn across the active (generally at 1000-1500 AGL), thus entering a shortened downwind leg, then base turn and final. Fighters may begin the approach in various formations, but each pilot breaks a few seconds behind the leader, which results in the entire flight entering downwind properly spaced for landing. This is not the approach I saw used when I was a military controller, nor was it used at any air show I attended during the 70s. The approach I described early in this thread was common practice by AF and Navy aviators at that time. Things change. OG PS: Dude, I can watch YouTube videos with no problem, so the issue may be something to do with my security. For instance, I don't have javascript installed. That prevents me from seeing some videos, although other formats are more common and I have no problem with them. How that might affect the Csim embedded videos, I have no idea.
  18. Old Guy

    Odd errors

    Cap didn't do an overhead approach. He flew an abbreviated upwind, then pitched left into a downwind, then base leg, and final approach. Absolutely standard, but not an overhead approach. They need an ATC guy to correct their phraseology. 🙄 OG
  19. Last week
  20. The Dude

    Odd errors

    OG, They are just YouTube video embeds. I'm using Google Chrome as my browser and I don't think it even has Flash enabled, so it can't be a Flash thing. Just tried this page in a very old version of Firefox browser, and the embedded video still works fine. Here's a direct link to Cap's landing video if you need it: https://www.youtube.com/embed/V4xdYcdqU_s?start=1422
  21. Old Guy

    Odd errors

    Making a flawless overhead approach is a matter of pride for Navy and Air Force pilots. Spacing has to be perfect, the breaks absolutely identical, and the circling approach exactly the same. I'll check out some of Cap's videos. For some reason I can't see any of the videos posted here. What format are they? OG
  22. The Dude

    Odd errors

    There's a fantastic YouTube channel by a fellow called "Cap" who does daily videos on his Grim Reapers squad's DCS and ARMA operations. I've watched dozens of his videos and he always ends each DCS mission with all the surviving pilots coming in for a landing. Cap usually lands first, then "films" each pilot's landing from his own POV on the runway. You'll like Cap as he seems to be a stickler for the performance of the Overhead exactly as you described it. Pretty sure this is a video of Cap performing the Overhead pattern: I watch this guy's videos all the time. Does an amazing number of DCS tutorials. His Campaign videos are better than 90% of the stuff on Netflix, imo. Oh, and he's a funny bastard, too (kudos to Deacon for telling me about this channel)
  23. mikew

    Odd errors

    You're a tough crowd to please. I agree that not much effort goes into producing 'new' WW2 documentaries for channels like Discovery/History/NatGeo. The limited WW2 footage is going to be used over and over. When planes and ships are involved, I'm happy to gloss over the fact that they aren't necessarily authentic. In 'The Battle of the River Plate' from 1956, the Graf Spee is 'played' by the American cruiser USS Salem where no attempt at all was made to cover over US markings etc. It doesn't detract from my enjoyment one bit.
  24. Old Guy

    Odd errors

    Hah! Yeah. I've seen that same footage at least a thousand times. What really irks me are errors that even a few minutes of research would have corrected. Even recent WW2 movies get a lot of details wrong -- and even some major stuff. Some can't be helped. I watched a British detective show the other day in which a Spitfire at an air show was identified as a Spit II, even though it had a 4-blade prop and was obviously a later mark. In a WW2 documentary I saw yesterday the images were supposed to be of Marines at Guadalcanal, yet the soldiers were all wearing Army equipment and one was carrying a carbine. Probably not many people would have noticed. OG
  25. cobraj

    Friday

    morning all TGIF..off from working my second shift rotation. what did I miss? Government still shut down? Gotta get bread and milk the big one is coming our way this weekend!
  26. cobraj

    Odd errors

    I get OCD watching old WW2 movies showing airplanes.. seems every time they would show an airplane attacking it would show stock footage of Dauntless dive bombers whether american or Japanese!
  27. Donster

    This Day in WWII 17 January 1939 - 1945

    I didn't sign the treaty. And since the Japanese didn't either, then targeting them was justified.
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