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  1. Today
  2. Donster

    Wednesday

    Morning all. 67F with light rain. High of 86F.
  3. Ethyl Corporation Ad - June 1942 1940: All aliens and stateless persons living in Britain are forbidden to leave home between 10:30pm and 6am. 1940: Churchill orders the setting up of commando forces to be used for raiding occupied Europe. *Julie Adams 1940: The last night of the Dunkirk evacuation sees 26,700 French soldiers lifted from the beaches. This brings the total rescued to 224,686 British, 121,445 French and Belgian troops. Most of the French opt to return to France to continue the fight. During the evacuation, 177 aircraft were lost (Germans lost 140 aircraft). 1940: Admiralty announce the loss of six destroyers, 24 small warships and participation of 222 British naval vessels and 665 other craft in Dunkirk operation. 226 vessels are sunk altogether. Julie Adams 1940: 300 German planes bomb Paris inflicting around 900 casualties. 1940: British and French forces start to evacuate from Narvik in northern Norway. Julie Adams 1941: Attlee memorandum approved 2,430,000 to 19,000 at Labour Party conference: 'A necessary prelude to a just peace is a total victory.' 1941: Ex-Kaiser Wilhelm II, dies in exile in Holland. 1941: New Iraqi government is formed. Buick Ad - June 1942 1942: Task Force 16 (Spruance) and 17 (Fletcher) meet 350 miles north-east of Midway. Admiral Fletcher takes overall command of the joint task force, although the two would act separately. US land based aircraft from Midway spot the Japanese Transport Force about 600 miles from Midway. They launch attacks against this force, but without success. US reconnaissance aircraft spot the 2 carriers of the Japanese 2nd Carrier Striking Force, which were about 400 miles from Kiska in the Aleutians. 1943: The first fruits of victory reach British shops, Algerian wine. Julie Adams 1944: Hitler allows Kesselring to withdraw from Rome, which has now been declared an 'Open City'. 1944: The Japanese rearguard at Kohima retreats, ending a 64 day battle. Julie Adams *Julie Adams (age 88-2015) was born Betty May Adams on October 17, 1926 in Waterloo, Iowa. Although born in the Hawkeye State, Julie Adams grew up in Arkansas and made her acting debut in a third grade play, "Hansel and Gretel". Deciding to become an actress, she moved to California, where she worked three days a week as a secretary (to support herself) and spent the remainder of her time taking speech lessons and making the rounds at the various studios' casting departments. Her first movie role was playing a starlet, appropriately enough, in Paramount's "Red, Hot and Blue" (1949), followed by a leading role in the Lippert Western "The Dalton Gang" (1949). Over a period of five weeks, she appeared in six more quickie Lippert Westerns. Adams' first big show biz break was at Universal, when she appeared in a screen test opposite All-American footballer Leon Hart, a Detroit Lions end. It was Hart who was being considered by the studio, but the gridiron star flopped while Universal execs flipped over Adams. The studio changed her first name from Betty to Julia (and later to Julie). Adams was featured as the bathing beauty Kay Lawrence in 1954's "Creature from the Black Lagoon". Julie Adams Later in her career, she played guest starring roles for television, including "12 O'Clock High", "The Gallant Men", "Maverick", "The F.B.I.", "The Big Valley", "The Man and the Challenge", "Mannix", "Cagney & Lacey", and as real estate agent "Eve Simpson" on "Murder, She Wrote". Most recent TV appearances are the shows "CSI: NY", "Cold Case", and "Lost". Adams died on February 3, 2019 in Los Angeles, California, aged 92. She is survived by her two sons. Her cremains are buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery in Malvern, Arkansas. TRIVIA: Height: 5' 6" (1.68 m) Measurements: 35-25-36 Universal publicity in the '50s claimed that her legs won an award as "the most perfectly symmetrical in the world" and that they were insured for $125,000. Julie Adams was married to actor/director Ray Danton from 1954 until 1981; they had two sons: Steven Danton, an assistant director, and Mitchell Danton, an editor. Buick Ad - June 1945
  4. Stans

    Wednesday

    Morning y'all, day 65 of 70. Clear skies, 78% humidity and 67F. Expecting sunshine this morning and a few clouds in the afternoon. Today we could see the mercury hit 94F. The governor will permit most of Virginia to enter phase 2 of reopening on Friday. Northern Virginia, where most of the infections are located, and the city of Richmond, where the mayor has proved to be ineffective at leading anything, will remain in phase 1.
  5. Yesterday
  6. Donster

    Tuesday

    Morning all. 67F under clear skies with 87% humidity and a SW wind at 10 MPH. Today is all about the heat and humidity as highs hit the 90s for the first time this year. The heat index will be 90F to 100F this afternoon. Peaceful protests in town so far. Violent in the State Capital. Some damage and tear gas used to disperse crowds.
  7. Dodge Ad - June 1943 1940: 26,200 British and French troops are evacuated from the beaches at Dunkirk today. Virtually all British soldiers have now been evacuated and so the remaining French troops have taken over the defense of the perimeter. 1941: US statement of policy respecting French possessions in the Western Hemisphere. 1941: Hitler and Mussolini meet at the Brenner Pass on the German-Italian border to discuss the progress of the war. *Irene Hervey 1941: Goring tells the Luftwaffe 'There is no unconquerable island'. The Ruhr industrial area bombed by RAF. 1941: Vichy publishes anti-Semitic legislation based on German laws. Jews banned from public office. 1941: A Greek government-in-exile is formed in Egypt. Irene Hervey 1942: The RAF' launches it's second 1,000 bomber raid (although only 956 took off) and hits Essen, but due to the haze over the city, the results were minimal and the RAF lost 31 aircraft. Nevertheless, Churchill was highly impressed and sanctioned further raids on this scale. 1942: The Germans begin a five day bombardment, using all the artillery at their disposal, including super heavy siege artillery, against Sevastopol in order to soften up the defenses ready for the main assault. Champion Spark Plugs Ad - June 1944 1943: The Red Air Force bombs Kiev and Roslavl, while the Luftwaffe bombs Kursk. 1943: Japanese forces are reported to be in full retreat on Yangtze. Irene Hervey 1944: U.S. troops are now only 20 miles from Rome. 1944: The Bulgarian government seeks terms of surrender from the western allies. 1944: The first shuttle raid, operation 'Frantic' is made by 130 B-17s of the US 15th Air Force based at Tripoli. The raid attacks rail yards at Debrecen in Hungary and then flies on to Soviet airfields at Poltava in the Ukraine. Irene Hervey 1944: Secret negotiations between the Romanian government of Marshal Antonescu and representatives of the Soviet Union begin in Stockholm, Sweden. 1944: The British 2nd Division begins its advance to relieve Imphal as the Japanese renew attacks on Bishenpur. The Chinese besiege Myitkyina, near the Chinese border in northern Burma. Irene Hervey *Born Beulah Irene Herwick on July 11, 1909 in Venice, California, Irene Hervey began her acting career after being introduced to a casting agent from MGM. After a successful screen test, she was signed by the studio and made her screen debut in the 1933 film "The Stranger's Return", opposite Lionel Barrymore. Though signed by MGM, Hervey was loaned out by the studio and appeared in several films including United Artists' "The Count of Monte Cristo" (1934) and "With Words and Music", released by Grand National Films, Inc.. In 1936, Hervey left MGM and signed with Universal Pictures. While at Universal, Hervey appeared in "The League of Frightened Men" (1937) and "Destry Rides Again" (1939) with Marlene Dietrich and James Stewart. In 1943, Hervey was seriously injured in a car accident and was forced to retire from acting for five years. Irene Hervey Hervey returned to acting in 1948 with the film "Mickey", followed by "Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid". By the early 1950s, she began appearing in the new medium of the era; television. Throughout the 1950s and early 1960s, Hervey appeared in several television shows including "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1 episode, 1959), "Peter Gunn" (1 episode, 1961), Perry Mason (3 episodes, 1958-1963), "Hawaiian Eye" (2 episodes, 1961-1962) and "The Twilight Zone" (1964). In 1965, she landed a regular role on "The Young Marrieds", followed by a stint on the short lived series "Honey West" as the titular character's Aunt Meg. In 1969, Hervey was nominated for an Emmy Award for her appearance on "My Three Sons". After roles in "Cactus Flower" and the 1971 film "Play Misty for Me" with Clint Eastwood, Hervey retired from acting. She took a job working at a travel agency in Sherman Oaks, California and briefly returned to acting in 1978 with a role in "Charlie's Angels". In 1981, she made her last onscreen appearance in the television movie "Goliath Awaits". As a teenager, Hervey married her first husband William Fenderson in 1929 and had a daughter, Gail, before divorcing. In 1936, she met and married actor Allan Jones. The couple had a son, singer Jack Jones (famous for singing the theme song for the TV Series "The Love Boat"), before divorcing in 1957. Irene Hervey died on December 20, 1998 of heart failure in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, aged 89. Dodge Ad - June 1944
  8. An update on the crash, it is looking like it resulted from a bird strike. http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/flight-safety/article-template-flight-safety.page?doc=ct114161-tutor-from-the-investigator/kae62tqg
  9. Stans

    Tuesday

    Morning y'all, clear skies, 79% humidity and a very cool 55F. Expecting clouds to roll in soon and we will have a mostly cloudy day with a high of 85F. A bit of a sleepless night last night, even with cool air filtering in through the windows. Violence and riots continue across our nation and my corner of Virginia is not exempt. The county in which I reside received credible threats of attacks on neighborhoods. Every little sound startled me from a very light sleep.
  10. Last week
  11. Stans

    Monday

    Yep, it was definitely a Monday.
  12. cobraj

    Monday

    ....afternoon all, it's monday...
  13. June 18, 1965 - Nguyen Cao Ky takes power in South Vietnam as the new prime minister with Nguyen Van Thieu functioning as official chief of state. They lead the 10th government in 20 months. June 4, 1966 - A three-page anti-war advertisement appears in the New York Times signed by 6400 teachers and professors. June 25, 1966 - Political unrest in South Vietnam abates following the crackdown on Buddhist rebels by Prime Minister Ky, including the arrest of Buddhist leader Tri Quang. Ky now appeals for calm. June 29, 1966 - Citing increased infiltration of Communist guerrillas from North Vietnam into the South, the U.S. bombs oil depots around Hanoi and Haiphong, ending a self-imposed moratorium. The U.S. is very cautious about targeting the city of Hanoi itself over concerns for the reactions of North Vietnam's military allies, China and the Soviet Union. This concern also prevents any U.S. ground invasion of North Vietnam, despite such recommendations by a few military planners in Washington. Claudia Cardinale June 1967 - The Mobile Riverine Force becomes operational utilizing U.S. Navy 'Swift' boats combined with Army troop support to halt Viet Cong usage of inland waterways in the Mekong Delta. Claudia Cardinale June 5, 1968 - Robert F. Kennedy is shot and mortally wounded in Los Angeles just after winning the California Democratic presidential primary election. June 8, 1969 - President Nixon meets South Vietnam's President Nguyen Van Thieu at Midway Island and informs him U.S. troop levels are going to be sharply reduced. During a press briefing with Thieu, Nixon announces "Vietnamization" of the war and a U.S. troop withdrawal of 25,000 men. June 27, 1969 - Life magazine displays portrait photos of all 242 Americans killed in Vietnam during the previous week, including the 46 killed at 'Hamburger Hill.' The photos have a stunning impact on Americans nationwide as they view the once smiling young faces of the dead. Claudia Cardinale June 3, 1970 - NVA begin a new offensive toward Phnom Penh in Cambodia. The U.S. provides air strikes to prevent the defeat of Lon Nol's inexperienced young troops. June 22, 1970 - American usage of jungle defoliants in Vietnam is halted. June 24, 1970 - The U.S. Senate repeals the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. June 30, 1970 - U.S. troops withdraw from Cambodia. Over 350 Americans died during the incursion. Claudia Cardinale June 1971 - During a college commencement speech, Senator Mike Mansfield labels the Vietnam war "a tragic mistake." June 13, 1971 - The New York Times begins publication of the 'Pentagon Papers,' a secret Defense Department archive of the paperwork involved in decisions made by previous White House administrations concerning Vietnam. Publication of the classified documents infuriates President Nixon. June 15, 1971 - Nixon attempts to stop further publication of the Pentagon Papers through legal action against the Times in the U.S. District Court. June 18, 1971 - The Washington Post begins its publication of the Pentagon Papers. The Times and Post now become involved in legal wrangling with the Nixon administration which soon winds up before the U.S. Supreme Court. June 22, 1971 - A non-binding resolution passed in the U.S. Senate urges the removal of all American troops from Vietnam by year's end. June 28, 1971 - The source of the Pentagon Papers leak, Daniel Ellsberg, surrenders to police. June 30, 1971 - The U.S. Supreme Court rules 6-3 in favor of the New York Times and Washington Post publication of the Pentagon Papers. June 1971 - George Jackson replaces William Colby as head of CORDS. June 1, 1972 - Hanoi admits Operation Linebacker I is causing severe disruptions. June 9, 1972 - Senior U.S. military advisor John Paul Vann is killed in a helicopter crash near Pleiku. He had been assisting South Vietnamese troops in the defense of Kontum. June 17, 1972 - Five burglars are arrested inside the Watergate building in Washington while attempting to plant hidden microphones in the Democratic National Committee offices. Subsequent investigations will reveal they have ties to the Nixon White House. June 28, 1972 - South Vietnamese troops begin a counter-offensive to retake Quang Tri Province, aided by U.S. Navy gunfire and B-52 bombardments. June 30, 1972 - General Frederick C. Weyand replaces Gen. Abrams as MACV commander in Vietnam. June 19, 1973 - The U.S. Congress passes the Case-Church Amendment which forbids any further U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia, effective August 15, 1973. The veto-proof vote is 278-124 in the House and 64-26 in the Senate. The Amendment paves the way for North Vietnam to wage yet another invasion of the South, this time without fear of U.S. bombing. June 24, 1973 - Graham Martin becomes the new U.S. ambassador to South Vietnam.
  14. June 25, 1950: North Korean forces cross border with South Korea. North Korean People's Army (NKPA) numbers approximately 135,000 men; Republic of Korea (ROK) Army contains 98,000 soldiers. June 27, 1950: President Harry S. Truman deploys the 7th Fleet to the waters off Taiwan to prevent the spread of the conflict in Korea to other Far East waters. June 27, 1950: First air victory of the war. A 68th All-Weather Squadron F-82 shoots down North Korean Yak fighter. (Two enemy planes are destroyed in this battle). June 29, 1950: Fifth Air Force's 3rd Bombardment Group sends 18 B-26 Invader light bombers against Heijo Airfield near the North Korean capital of Pyongyang: 25 aircraft are destroyed on the ground; one Yak fighter is shot down. Marilyn Maxwell June 1, 1951: General Van Fleet strengthens the Kansas line and sends forces farther north, toward Line Wyoming. June 1-20, 1951: Battle for the Punchbowl. The 1st Marine Division advances northeast of the Hwachon Reservoir and encounters heavy North Korean resistance, but succeeds in taking its objective, a ridgeline overlooking a deep circular valley nicknamed the "Punchbowl." June 23, 1951: The Soviet Union calls for armistice talks. Marilyn Maxwell June 6-14, 1952: Operation COUNTER. The 45th Infantry Division launches a two-phased series of attacks to establish 11 patrol bases in the Old Baldy area. Second and 34d Battalions, 180th Infantry Regiment, fight fiercely for Outpost Eerie on Hill 191, which is counterattacked by two Chinese battalions. June 23-26, 1952: Navy, Air Force and Marine aircraft conduct a series of attacks that heavily damage North Korea's vital hydroelectric dams and related facilities at Suiho and other sites on the Yalu River between North Korea and the People's Repbulic of China. The attacks knock out North Korea's power grid for two weeks. Marilyn Maxwell June 15, 1953: Far East Air Force (FEAF) Sabres Destroy 16 MiGs, the largest number shot down in one day.
  15. Donster

    Monday

    Morning all. 62F under scattered clouds. A few showers this morning. SSW winds at 21 MPH. High of 83 F.
  16. Packard Ad - June 1944 1940: All signposts which might be helpful to parachutists landing in Britain taken down. Unemployment in Britain falls 92,000 in May to 881,000, giving a total fall of 611,000 in a year. 1940: German onslaught continues at Dunkirk. General Lord Gort, C-in-C BEF, returns from Flander's with another 64,400 troops who were evacuated off the beaches this day. However, in future, the evacuation will only continue during the hours of darkness due to the high losses of warships to daylight air attacks. *Frances Gifford 1940: British forces evacuate the Bodo area of Norway, 120 miles S-W of Narvik. 1940: The British destroyers Keith, Basilisk and Havant and the transport Scotia are sunk by Luftwaffe dive bombers, near Dunkirk. 1940: Luftwaffe raids industrial centres in the Rhone Valley from Lyons to Marseilles. Frances Gifford 1941: Clothes rationing introduced in Britain. 1941: The Luftwaffe carries out a night raid (110 bombers) on Manchester. 1941: The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen arrives in Brest. Frances Gifford 1941: The evacuation of Crete is completed, with 17,000 British, Commonwealth and Greek troops being rescued, although the Australians lose more than half their contingent. Final figures for the British are 16,500 killed, wounded or captured, along with a large number of warships sunk or damaged, while the Germans lose about 6,200 men. 1941: Stukas sink the British cruiser Calcutta off Alexandria. 1941: British forces enter Baghdad and reinstate the Regent. Frances Gifford 1942: America begins sending Lend-Lease materials to the Soviet Union. Convoy PQ-17. 1942: Mexico declares war on Germany, Italy and Japan. 1942: Himmler is put in charge of the German ARP system. Frances Gifford 1942: The siege of Sevastopol by the 11th Army continues with a round-the-clock bombardment by heavy artillery and Luftwaffe bombers. 1942: Hitler arrives at Poltava, the HQ of Army Group South to approve Field Marshal von Bocks plan for the main offensive. A high level plan had been prepared to make the Russians believe that Moscow was still the objective, Goebbels organised leaks to this effect to the foreign press while Army Group Centre made overt preparations for an offensive under the cover-name of 'Kremlin'. 1942: Jews in Belgium, Croatia, Slovakia, Romania ordered to wear yellow stars. 1942: Rommel takes the fortified 'box' that is held by the British 150th Brigade in the Gazala defensive line and secures the 'Cauldron'. This enables him to get much needed supplies flowing. Rommel now turns the German 90th Light Division and the Italian Ariete Armoured Division against Bir Hacheim in an attempt to wipe out the Free French garrison which still holds out. He also distracts the British by sending the 21st Panzer Division northeast to operate nearer to Tobruk. Packard Ad - June 1944 1943: Eden announces that Empire casualties in first three years of war are 92,089 killed, 226,719 missing, 88,294 wounded and 107,891 captured. 1943: The British actor Leslie Howard, flying back to Britain from a five-week lecture tour in Spain and Portugal boosting the Allied cause, is killed when his DC-3 airliner is shot down by German fighter planes over the Bay of Biscay. Although it came to be believed that the real target was Howard's manager, Alfred Chenhalls, who bore a passing resemblance to Winston Churchill, it now appears certain that Howard was the actual target. Alerted to Howard's presence in the Iberian Peninsula by German agents, Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels had ordered the plane shot down in order to silence the outspoken anti-Nazi actor. 1943: The allied 2nd Tactical Air Force is formed in UK. Frances Gifford 1943: BdU (C-in-C U-boats) adopts a new policy of fighting back at Allied sub-hunting aircraft with the U-boats' own AA guns while crossing the Bay of Biscay on the surface. This tactic proves to be largely unsuccessful and is soon abandoned. 1943: The Red Air Force attacks German rear communications and airfields at Smolensk, Orel and Bryansk. Frances Gifford 1944: The British Eighth Army captures Frosinone to the South East of Rome. 1945: Byrnes and Committee advise the President to drop the bomb. 1945: U.S. troops make new landings on Okinawa as forces from the East and West coasts link up South of Shuri. Frances Gifford *Mary Frances Gifford was born on December 7, 1920 in Long Beach, California and at the age of 16 had applied to UCLA School of Law with no intention of pursuing an acting career. With a friend, she visited the studios of Samuel Goldwyn to watch a film being made and while there was spotted by a talent scout who brought her to the attention of Goldwyn, who signed her for an acting contract. After only receiving minor roles, she moved to RKO where she was cast in several uncredited supporting roles in films of the late 1930s, including "Stage Door" (1937) starring Katharine Hepburn and Ginger Rogers. In 1938 at the age of 18, she married character actor James Dunn and in 1939 landed her first leading role, in the low-budget "Mercy Plane", opposite her husband. A planned retirement was interrupted briefly when she played another uncredited role in James Stewart's break-out film "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (1939). She played several more minor roles before she was, in 1941, loaned to Republic Pictures and cast in the role which would arguably produce her most enduring fame: as the semi-clad, Nyoka in "Jungle Girl", a 15-chapter movie serial, based on the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The role was the first time since Pearl White in the silent era that a female actor had played the lead in the movie serial genre. The following year, Republic made a sequel "Perils of Nyoka" but Gifford was no longer available and the heroine's part was played by Kay Aldridge. With Gifford's film career gaining momentum and Dunn's on the decline partly due to his battle with alcoholism, the marriage had failed by 1942. She left RKO for Paramount Pictures where she acted in several films including "The Glass Key" (1942). In 1943 she made another Tarzan type movie with Johnny Weissmuller in "Tarzan Triumphs" at RKO. That year she also left Paramount and moved to the prestigious Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio with the sponsorship of an MGM executive. Frances Gifford At MGM there was more success playing leading roles in such films as "Our Vines Have Tender Grapes" (1945) and "She Went to the Races" (1945) and the more notable "The Arnelo Affair" (1947). She also played in supporting roles including "Thrill of a Romance" (1945) with Esther Williams, and "Luxury Liner" (1948) with Jane Powell. In 1948 Gifford was almost killed in a car accident, receiving severe head injuries, an event which sidelined her career and her health. She attempted a comeback in two early 1950s films, "Sky Commando" (1953) and "Riding High" (1950). However, during the 1950s her mental and physical health declined to the point where she was placed into Camarillo State Mental Hospital in 1958. She would spend almost the entire next 25 years in and out of various institutions. In 1983 a journalist found her working in the Pasadena, California city library having apparently recovered. Gifford spent her final years in quiet obscurity and died of emphysema in a convalescent center in Pasadena on January 16, 1994 at the age of 73. Despite reports that she is the sister of football star Frank Gifford (also from southern California), the latter clearly indicates in his autobiography that his 'clan' consisted of a brother Waine and a sister Winona. Frances, evidently, was no relation. Packard Ad - June 1945
  17. Stans

    Monday

    Morning y'all, day 63 of 70. Partly cloudy skies, 47% humidity, and 57F this morning; why couldn't the weekend weather be this nice? Expecting the clouds to diminish and by late morning, full sunshine. This afternoon we should see a high of 74F and with a few clouds popping up late in the afternoon.
  18. cobraj

    Sunday

    morning all. another beautiful day on tap.. lots of chores to do today!
  19. Donster

    Sunday

    Morning all. 49F under clear skies. Partly cloudy with light winds out of the South and a high of 72F.
  20. Philco Ad - May 1943 1940: The Defense of Dunkirk continues as 68,000 allied troops are evacuated. The French defense of Lille collapses. Churchill flies to Paris for a meeting of the Supreme Allied War Council, the second time since the 10th May. 1940: Heavy Luftwaffe attacks sink two French destroyers off the beaches at Dunkirk. *Barbara Stanwyck 1941: German bombers attack Dublin by mistake: Eire government protests, Germans later offer compensation. British civilian casualties for May announced: 5,394 killed and 5,181 injured. 1941: British forces enter Baghdad and an armistice is signed. The terms of the armistice require that all axis personnel in Iraq are to be interned and that Iraq support the British cause against the axis. Barbara Stanwyck 1942: Bad weather over Hamburg, means the alternate target, Cologne is selected by Bomber Command for the first 1,000 night-bomber raid of the war. 1,046 heavy bombers take off with 850 claiming to have attacked the target with 1,455 tons of explosive. The raid lasted about 75 minutes, a new departure from the past when aircraft were given much more latitude as to when they attacked the target. The raid destroys 600 acres of built-up area, kills 486 civilians and makes 59,000 people homeless. Of the participating aircraft, 40 failed to return and a further 19 crashed for one reason or another. 1942: Since the start of Operation Paukenschlag (Drum Beat) in January, the U-boats operating along the US eastern seaboard have sunk 111 vessels. Barbara Stanwyck 1942: The battle of the 'Cauldron' begins as Rommel attacks the fortified box in the Gazala line that is held by the 150th Brigade of the British 50th Division. The Italians attack from the west as elements of the Afrika Korps attack from the east. Meanwhile Rommel's anti-tank gunners, repulse a number of British armored counter-attacks against his position in the 'Cauldron'. However, Lieutenant General Ritchie is hampered by his inability to concentrate his armor and so is unable to relieve the 150th Brigade. 1942: A Japanese midget submarine enters Sydney Harbor. Barbara Stanwyck 1943: By the end of May, 41 U-boats have been sunk in the Atlantic due to greatly improved allied anti-submarine techniques and tactics (Hedgehog, greater-range patrol aircraft, better radar, more escort vessels and carriers, plus the advantage of having broken the German Navy Enigma code). "Black May" effectively marks the end of a sustained German U-boat campaign in WW2 which did come very close to starving out Britain and forcing her to make terms with Germany. 1943: The Danish resistance blows up an engine shed at Toender as sabotage mounts, despite Danish King's appeal for a halt. Maytag Ad - May 1944 1943: The U.S. 15th Air Force bombs German and Italian airfields at Foggia, destroying many aircraft on the ground. 1943: Chiang Kai-Shek claims three Japanese divisions have been surrounded on Yangtze River. Barbara Stanwyck 1943: Japanese end their occupation of the Aleutian Islands as the U.S. completes the capture of Attu. 1944: The Russians repel a heavy German counter attack North of Jassy, in the southern Ukraine. Stalin gives the go-ahead to Operation 'Bagration' (the Russian summer offensive) which is to destroy Army Group Centre in Byelorussia. Barbara Stanwyck 1945: Chiang Kai-Shek resigns the Chinese Premiership but remains as President and Generalissimo, with Dr. Soong succeeding him as premier. 1945: Osaka is totally burnt out by U.S. incendiaries. Barbara Stanwyck *Today Barbara Stanwyck is remembered primarily as the matriarch of the family known as the Barkleys on the TV western "The Big Valley" (1965), wherein she played Victoria, and from the hit drama "The Colbys" (1985). But she was known to millions of other fans for her movie career, which spanned the period from 1927 until 1964, after which she appeared on television until 1986. It was a career that lasted for 59 years. She was born Ruby Catherine Stevens on July 16, 1907, in Brooklyn, New York. She went to work at the local telephone company for $14 a week, but she had the urge (a dream--that was all it was) somehow to enter show business. When not working, she pounded the pavement in search of dancing jobs. The persistence paid off. Barbara was hired as a chorus girl for the princely sum of $40 a week, much better than the wages she was getting from the phone company. She was 17, and she was going to make the most of the opportunity that had been given her. In 1928 Barbara moved to Hollywood, where she was to start one of the most lucrative careers filmdom had ever seen. She was an extremely versatile actress who could adapt to any role. Barbara was equally at home in all genres, from melodramas, such as "Forbidden" (1932) and "Stella Dallas" (1937), to thrillers, such as "Double Indemnity" (1944), one of her best films, also starring Fred MacMurray (as you have never seen him before). She also excelled in comedies such as "Remember the Night" (1940) and "The Lady Eve" (1941). Another genre she excelled in was westerns, "Union Pacific" (1939) being one of her first and TV's "The Big Valley" (1965) (her most memorable role) being her last. In 1983, she played in the ABC hit mini-series "The Thorn Birds" (1983), which did much to keep her in the eye of the public. She turned in an outstanding performance as Mary Carson. Barbara Stanwyck Barbara was considered a gem to work with for her serious but easygoing attitude on the set. She worked hard at being an actress, and she never allowed her star quality to go to her head. She was nominated for four Academy Awards, though she never won. She turned in magnificent performances for all the roles she was nominated for, but the "powers that be" always awarded the Oscar to someone else. However, in 1982 she was awarded an honorary Academy Award for "superlative creativity and unique contribution to the art of screen acting." Sadly, Barbara died of congestive heart failure, emphysema and chronic obstructive lung disease at St. John's Hospital, in Santa Monica, California, in 1990. She was 82, leaving 93 movies and a host of TV appearances as her legacy to us. Fram Oil Filter Ad - May 1944
  21. Stans

    Sunday

    Morning y'all, day 62 of 70. Mostly cloudy, 62F, but only 51% humidity. Expecting the clouds to thin and we should have sunshine this afternoon and a high of 75F.
  22. Great footage as usual from the onboard cameras. Shame about SpaceX's SN4 Starship prototype yesterday. Spectacular though.
  23. successful! The Dragon capsule is in orbit.
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