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Wombat to join Falcon 4.32 BMS


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Well I was half Correct. The thing about setting the Rudder to keyboard should have been a given..

Well, think I'm also only half right as well. :rolleyes: Its bigger than this. I need to include: selection of which " .key" file, checking the Right Indexer when in the 'pit, and using of the S1 (MSL Step) button to be free of keystrokes with the Cougar. I was a bit premature posting at the SimHQ forum but I was after input from others. Unfortunately -Ice is busy with other things. But I've got it this time, but will hold back from posting at the moment.

I'm now working on AF NWS and that's proving more difficult. (Although I have found a way to NWS with the Cougar stick). On page 307 of the AF manual it shows the MSL Step button working with NWS in the AF Sim but with what " .key" file.? On page 305 it talks about " .....Key Mapping ....... Although we provide a default mapping of keys. ....". Its that default mapping "file" that I'm after.

I'm assuming it works with the Cougar in the same way as "BMS.key" works in 4.32. In other words the MSL Step button engages/disengages the NWS. My current AF Sim " .key" file is "keystrokes.key". But this doesn't program the MSL Step button.

I've even loaded the "BMS.key" file into AF and it works fine with the MSL Step button in operating the Nose Wheel. But I can't include the introduction of the "BMS.key" into the AF Sim as a solution. I must work with what comes with AF and AF only. Well .......... at least when advising others of what to do.

Any chance that you would have the original "default .key" file that operated the MSL Step button for NWS in AF?

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NWS has always been Shift /. It may be listed in BMS as MSL Step.

<SHIFT> + < / > is listed in BMS.key as NWS and matches for the MSL Step with the Cougar. It even matches when BMS.key file is loaded into Falcon AF. But the default AF .key file doesn't match it to the MSL Step even though the training manual (page 307) shows the use of the MSL Step for NWS. Just can't work out what .key file the manual was using.

Its all a bit academic I'm afraid. Almost every AF pilot has moved over to BMS4.32 and that's understandable. AF issues don't take much of a priority these days. However if the NWS MSL Step button doesn't work in AF, its just a matter of using the keyboard and <SHIFT> + < / >. Its just means you have to take your hands of the Cougar to implement, which is a norm for much of the AF training mission cockpit activations. Thanks.

EDIT: Sounds as though you've uninstalled AF?

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EDIT: Sounds as though you've uninstalled AF?

It's no longer installed, though I still have my saved folder so I could get it back in no time. Not much point, though; no reason to go back.

And what you just described is one of the hazards of AF training. It gets you thinking about keystrokes and not functions, which will get you nowhere with BMS. If you're going to train in AF, I recommend using Jagstang's AF profile which mimics the real F-16 so any training you do will carry over. This, and keep printouts of the HOTAS functions available so you can translate functions instead of depending on keypresses. You'll learn the method to the madness soon enough.

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This doesn't encourage me to use Jagstang's profile.

Extract from
TM HOTAS COUGAR FILE FOR FALCON 4.0 ALLIED FORCE v1.03 using a Track IR

Designed and tested by Paul "Jagstang" Joy

RUDDERS

Each of the tmj files are designed for people who have, or do not require rudder pedal control.
If however you do not have rudder pedals but do require some rudder control then code is included within each of the tmj files to allow you to control rudder input by rotating the ANT ELEV Controls
. Antenna Elevation can be controlled by holding in S3 at the same time as rotating the ANt ELEV dial. To activate this option there are two parts to change in the tmj file, please follow these instructions.

1. Open the tmj in Foxy

2.
Look for the following line and delete the part shown in red

Rem
USE
AXES_CONFIG (1, JOYX), (2, JOYY), (3, THR), (4, RNG), (5, RDDR), (6, ANT) Rem ** For No Rudders ** (remember to change the ANT ELEV section below).

3. Look for the following section and delete all parts shown in red

REM -------------------------

REM ANT ELEV

REM -------------------------

ANT /I ^

/O 1 20 (Antenna_Tilt_Down) (Antenna_Tilt_Up) (Antenna_Center) - FORCE_MACROS

Rem ** For No Rudders ** (Rem out or delete the two lines above and remove the Rem's from the two lines below. Remember to also unRem the USE AXES statement at the top.)

Rem
ANT /I 1 20 (Antenna_Tilt_Down) (Antenna_Tilt_Up) (Antenna_Center) - FORCE_MACROS

Rem
/O ^

4. Save the tmj file and download it to your cougar

5. That's it!
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Nothing wrong with that. Lets you have your cake and eat it too, so to speak.

When you move to BMS, the antenna knob will be strictly for antenna elevation (you won't have to use S3), so nothing is lost in translation.

If you're concerned with editing the file, just follow the instructions; it's pretty straightforward to me.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My two cents. I'm still learning how to program my X52 and how to land this thing, but last night I finally got to activate the NWS with the 'Shift+/" keys.

I could not get it working before until I realized that, at least on my underpowered machine, there was a time delay before it showed the green light and worked. All the tapping I was doing ineffective. I wonder if that's the problem here? Or is it my system?

Back to scouring the forums for learning the TAW.

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My two cents. I'm still learning how to program my X52 and how to land this thing, but last night I finally got to activate the NWS with the 'Shift+/" keys.

I could not get it working before until I realized that, at least on my underpowered machine, there was a time delay before it showed the green light and worked. All the tapping I was doing ineffective. I wonder if that's the problem here? Or is it my system?

Back to scouring the forums for learning the TAW.

I'm still working on providing definative advice regard NWS for BMS and AF. There's a whole thread at SimHQ and another at Benchmarks. Dispite what some say, its been a headache for many. I think I'm just about there, but still checking on my Cougar and also working with a Saitek X52 and a MS Sidewinder. Both the X52 and Sidewinder have a joystick twist function which can be used to ground steer providing you have NWS activated (ie. <SHIFT> plus < / >). Actually you can use other 'stick functions apart from the twist option but I won't complicate anything regarding that. You have to use something else with the Cougar as it doesn't have a twist 'stick function.

I thinks its important to recognize there are two parts in achieve NWS:

(1) Activate (ie. <SHIFT> plus < / >)

(2) Steer (eg. with the keyboard or a joystick's roll axis (ie. left and right with the 'stick) or twisting the 'stick, etc).

The more flight operations you can transfer to a joystick and/or throttle, rather than using the keyboard, the easier it is to fly and especially when landinging in regard to NW Activation and Steering.. With the Cougar you can activate and steer without using the keyboard. Activation is pre-progammed to a button press. You can setup a button on your X52 button to do the same. Nothing worse than getting the bird down, only to make a hole in a hanger while you take your hands off the joystick while searching for the <SHIFT> plus < / > keys on the keyboard.

If you have achieved activation and steering with your X52 and providing you are activating with the keyboard but steering with the 'stick, that's fine. However if you are having trouble with either, just post below and I'll direct you to the thread at the SimHQ and Benchmark forums.

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Wise man. :icon_rock: If you can NWS by whatever method, IMHO that's great. You can always refine the method later. After learned to take-off and land, etc. You'll be tweeking your X52 profile to make it easier.

I'm currently away from my gaming computer which means I;ve got no Cougar, no TrackIR and no 21" monitor. I'm using my Netbook with its 10" screen and keyboard, plus my MS Sidewinder Precision 2 joystick. I've been practicing landing. The Sidewinder cannot be programmed with button presses in XP (or don't think it can) so other than throttle, rudder, pitch and roll, everything else has to activated by keystrokes. Hence NSW activation and braking has to be achieved using the keyboard. I've twice veared off the runway and once hit the fence when fumbling to find and push the right keys. :rofl: But that's no problem with my Cougar setup. In the meantime, the landing practice (Training Mission 9 in AF) with the Netbook is just great. :coffeetime:

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As I've said in the previous post I've been doing a bit of landing practice. I had a look at the Landing Aid. Very interesting, but I think I've progressed beyond its value. However, all seems setup correctly at touchdown (11 degrees AoA, 150 knots, 2.5 degrees glide slope, FPM pointing at the end of the runway) but I bounce on touchdown. :(

Is this because I'm not flaring?

Maybe the 2.5 degree glide slope is too great at touchdown?

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Most glide slopes are 2.5 to 3 degrees. That's about 600'/minute sink at 150 kts. The flare is to reduce vertical velocity as the wheels touch while keeping the forward velocity just above a stall. That's a lot of energy to translate to almost zero vertical while forward speed slows to about 135.

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Most glide slopes are 2.5 to 3 degrees. That's about 600'/minute sink at 150 kts. The flare is to reduce vertical velocity as the wheels touch while keeping the forward velocity just above a stall. That's a lot of energy to translate to almost zero vertical while forward speed slows to about 135.

Thanks. Always seems funny to me that one lifts the FPM to flare. I worry this will increase the AoA and thus scrap the tail. :( I suppose the AoA remains the same as this is a function of forward velocity (ft/sec), while the FPM is a function direction (degrees). I assume to minimize the increase in AoA when flaring one might marginally increase the speed.

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Now completed the Instrument Landing (Mission 10) and Flame Out Landing (Mission 11). If one "over-shoots/under-shoot" the runway by turning in too slowly/too quickly in the instrument landing, its bloody hard to find the runway. ;) Slow and steady alignment I think is the trick.

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Thanks. Always seems funny to me that one lifts the FPM to flare. I worry this will increase the AoA and thus scrap the tail. :( I suppose the AoA remains the same as this is a function of forward velocity (ft/sec), while the FPM is a function direction (degrees). I assume to minimize the increase in AoA when flaring one might marginally increase the speed.

These are valid concerns, and by not flaring you make one hell of a Naval Aviator (there's no flaring when trapping on the boat)! If you're maintaining proper AoA and airspeed, then a careful flare won't raise your FPM by that much. You're also right to be concerned about the tail scraping, so a gentle flare is required, and I admittedly occasionally scrape the turkey feathers in BMS.

An interesting note regarding the FPM/AoA, and altitude vs. airspeed: while under a normal flight envelope throttle adjusts speed and pitch adjusts altitude, when you're in a slow flight/high AoA landing configuration the control inputs actually switch. In other words, when you're on final the throttle adjusts your altitude and the pitch adjusts your airspeed by tweaking your AoA, so when you're on final a flare will have minimal impact on your FPM, but your AoA will increase and your lift will slightly increase at the expense of speed.

One final thing: it seems counterintuitive (and definitely a no-go for the flameout landing), but do your approach at a higher throttle setting but with boards out. The reason for this is it takes more time for the engine to spool up than it takes for the airbrakes to retract, so if you can match your AoA/airspeed with boards out, then you can just pop them in if you need that extra speed.

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I haven't set up the x52 yet. So it's a Big drag on my progress. TAW is great, but I'm barely up to speed since I did a lousy set up.

But I'm impressed with the work done to make things easy. Thanks HF and team!

Trying to fly BMS is taking my attention. Adjusting the graphics is helping to adjust the float so basically I'm in the TO, land phase trying to not get lost in the area.

On the AoA, you can thing of it as the fuselage being the wing cross-section's amount of bite in the air. Higher more lift, but more drag.

If you can forget the HUD and just look at the flight instruments portion at 10K feet, you'll see that at 350 you're about one degree nose up on the ADI for level flight. Slowing to 200 kts or less your nose is a couple of degrees higher to keep level flight. The AoA to the left of the attitude will show that too.

When you're flaring, since the power is coming back, you're increasing AoA (lift and drag) to keep that minimum sink rate. (up to less-than-needed to drag the tailpipe.) Hopefully you touch ground then with that attitude.

The FPM is just that, where the plane's path will take you if you don't adjust anything. The HUD also has the AoA as the difference between the cross and the FPM.

(Just noticed HF answered it better).

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Once more or less established on final under instruments, (the localizer) I would suggest no more than a 15 degree correction, try for five or less bank and correction. Think the Falcon has a wind correction compensator.

I have to get used to flying the HUD and not the panel.

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:rofl:, Same rose, different color. If I learn and remember how to tune in and set up the nav switch, course heading and DED to the proper freq. and turn the instruments lights up, maybe I could get my head up and fly right. I mean, the HUD was supposed to make things easier, better, right? ;) I mean, it's all in there, right? All-l-l-l of it.

Oh, look at that shiny, blinking light!

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Thanks boys for the input. I'm a HUD lander. Like to see where I'm going .... :lol: . You do get a feel for it after numerous attempts. And you get your own preferences. Even with flame-out. I can put her down without much trouble. Seem to know when to brake, loose altitude, line up, etc from some way out. Gut feel. However to a complete instrument land (no looking out of canopy) is that possible.? OK I can manage my speed, FPM, AoA, even flare with instruments, but how do I hit the runway and not grass without looking? :shrug:

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Just completed Mission 12: Navigation and Timing. Wow ....... that's some mission! :o I think I've got it, even to using some of the alternatives covered in the mission preface but not in the mission instructions. There appears to be a number of ways of finding specific locations (eg. waypoints, target location, air bases, etc) but do we have a preferred way? Viewing the MFD would be my favourite as it matches what we do in TAW2.0. :icon_rock: Although correct timing's a problem in that case ....... :huh:

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