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TAW2.0 Brevity Codes: their meaning and correct use.


Wombat1940
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(My 2 cents) Looking for something else, I did run across a brevity code list in the "Articles" section on this site.

(Think you guys mentioned there also one published with TAW2.0?)

Don't know how updated the article is though. Some of it was new to me.

OK, a lot of it was new to me :coffeetime:

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Interesting ........ :huh:

AFFIRMATIVE

"Confirm" or "Yes", used in Aviation. Some air arms of military forces also use a "double click" sent over the radios by keying the mic twice to produce a "--" like Morse code, this is usually used when the pilot is unable to talk due to heavy workload or stress.

NEGATIVE

"No" or "NEG". Because over a poor quality connection the words "affirmative" and "negative" can be mistaken for one another ............, United States Navy instruction omits the use of either as prowords. Sailors are instructed to use, instead, "yes" and "no".

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procedure_word#Affirm.2C_Affirmative

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If the "interesting" comment refers to my comment on having transferred files to Kindle.

I had spent a week in Cleveland helping a friend recovering from serious knee surgery, and read the Kindle while waiting at the airport, in airplane, during doctor visits waiting for friend, or in down times.

Got a BMS manual, a couple of pieces on TAW, even cooking recipes and how-to manuals in the reader. Not the latest tech, but compact and handy for my reference and studying purposes.

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Interesting ........ :huh:

AFFIRMATIVE

"Confirm" or "Yes", used in Aviation. Some air arms of military forces also use a "double click" sent over the radios by keying the mic twice to produce a "--" like Morse code, this is usually used when the pilot is unable to talk due to heavy workload or stress.

NEGATIVE

"No" or "NEG". Because over a poor quality connection the words "affirmative" and "negative" can be mistaken for one another ............, United States Navy instruction omits the use of either as prowords. Sailors are instructed to use, instead, "yes" and "no".

Source: http://en.wikipedia.....2C_Affirmative

USN use of Yes/No is for sound powered phones, which is about the quality of two soup cans connected to a a string. For radio comms, I used Affirmative/Negative, though we rarely answered the equivalient of yes/no on the radio. This is also why we use brevity codes; the code itself often implies yes/no in its context. Example, when tasked with something, you reply "unable" for no, or "wilco" when you will comply. Likewise, when doing an IFF check, rather than calling "yes" or "no" in response that the signals are ok, the monitoring station calls "sweet" or "sour".

Also, while not "official", many aviators use the long "A" and say "A-ffirmative". This makes it less ambiguous.

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If the "interesting" comment refers to my comment on having transferred files to Kindle.

Got a BMS manual, a couple of pieces on TAW, even cooking recipes and how-to manuals in the reader. Not the latest tech, but compact and handy for my reference and studying purposes.

I swear by my eReader. I had a first gen. Nook, then upgraded to the Kindle Fire. I love it, and I made the TAW checklists with the eReader in mind.

Do you use Calibre? I find it a great tool to manage my non-Kindle pubs. Its indexing even allows you to put your non-kindle pubs in the "books" section instead of the default "docs", allowing you the full sorting ability.

BTW, if you ever get into DCS, there are cropped manuals available here, which make things very nice on a smaller screen.

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The USA did not sign the treaty, so game on!

Realistically, what makes cluster bombs nasty is what also makes them effective. You drop a bunch of bomblets over a small area to take out a group of targets in a single pass. This makes things much safer for the aircrew, who needs to only make one pass over a contested area. We don't use them near civilian populations because they are area effect weapons, though they can be delivered precisely by fusing a low burst altitude.

They're also useful for antiship operations on gunboats where dropping an iron bomb (and a likely miss) just means getting the ship wet. Of course, you dont' have a kid picking up an unexploded munition if it sinks to the bottom of the ocean.

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If the "interesting" comment refers to my comment on having transferred files to Kindle.

I had spent a week in Cleveland helping a friend recovering from serious knee surgery, and read the Kindle while waiting at the airport, in airplane, during doctor visits waiting for friend, or in down times.

Got a BMS manual, a couple of pieces on TAW, even cooking recipes and how-to manuals in the reader. Not the latest tech, but compact and handy for my reference and studying purposes.

Sorry Fittop, but it was not. It was just an interesting observation about very common brevity codes. If I have a visit to my favourite doctor, I'll wait over an hour to see him beyond the appointment time. Its no problem because he's just the best doctor. However .......... like you, I take reading matter with me while I wait to see him. FalconAF is a great read while waiting. :lol:

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USN use of Yes/No is for sound powered phones, which is about the quality of two soup cans connected to a a string. For radio comms, I used Affirmative/Negative, though we rarely answered the equivalient of yes/no on the radio. This is also why we use brevity codes; the code itself often implies yes/no in its context. Example, when tasked with something, you reply "unable" for no, or "wilco" when you will comply. Likewise, when doing an IFF check, rather than calling "yes" or "no" in response that the signals are ok, the monitoring station calls "sweet" or "sour".

Also, while not "official", many aviators use the long "A" and say "A-ffirmative". This makes it less ambiguous.

Thanks HF. Now that is interesting ..... I suggest we stick to A-ffirmative and Negative for TAW2.0 but not at exclusion of the others. Its just the "preferred/most commonly used" in TAW2.0 MP to pending newbies.

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CLUSTER-BOMBS=MK20's ???

Aren't these banned by some international treaty?....so if you're going to use them, I guess there's some other code word to use in case anyone is listening.

I have trouble with all the weapons. :( They've got nuclear arms in Falcon BMS. :whoa: I think I'd be happier flying as a medic in truth. However I constantly remind myself this just a simulator and not the real thing.

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No nukes, but there was an international ban on cluster munitions back in 2008. The USA did not sign the treaty, nor (as mikew indicated) did many of the major international players.

I'm glad we didn't agree to the ban, and I'll say that if I were an aviator who could be possibly tasked with CAS (e.g. A-10, F-16, Marine F/A-18) I would resign my commission if we did.

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  • 1 month later...

Here are some questions to help clear my head on brevity codes. In TAW single player we hear our wingmen say:

FOX ONE at an AIM 120R

FOX TWO at an AIM 120C

FOX THREE at an AIM9x "Sidewinder"

This implies that the "R" is a semi-active radar-guided missile, the "C" is an infrared-guided and the Sidewinder is an active radar-guided. I think I don't need to explain why this doesn't make any sense. So, what should we use in the context of TAW?

I also have some doubts about the RWR warnings.

Does SPIKE mean any type of RWR detection?

Is NAILS the same as SPIKE?

MISSILE is obviously a radar lock from a missile, but I didn't see this on the TAW reference list. Do you confirm?

Is that information correct?

And now a joke..

Lead: Awacs, I see a GORILLA at 3 o'clock, do you TALLY?

Awacs: NEGATIVE, those are SWEET CHICKS and they are NAKED!
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Let's start with the Fox calls

  • Fox One is a semi-active radar homing (SARH) missile like the AIM-7 Sparrow. You don't use these in TAW, so any Fox One calls by the AI are incorrect.
  • Fox Two is an IR homing missile like the AIM-9 Sidewinder.
  • Fox Three is an active radar homing (ARH) missile like the AIM-120 AMRAAM. Fox Three should apply to both the C and R variants.

The difference between the C and R is range. The C is an actual AMRAAM, while the R was a theoretical long range Ramjet missile when the game came out in 1997. The R has longer range, but you can't carry as many as you can the C. Supposedly the C is more maneuverable within the no escape range, but I haven't tested this enough to be sure.

Finally, Spike vs. Nails. Nails just means that you get indications of a search radar, or perhaps a "blip" with TWS. With "nails" you know that they are out there. Spike means that they have locked you. Spike means that they know you are out there. Missile (or defensive, defending) means that you are actively trying to defeat a missile that has been shot at you.

Good joke BTW. :lol:

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Bit off topic, but worth remembering for TAW2.0 when engaging Shilkas, heavily armed ships.

https://www.box.com/...oeff7fpgf1yedw1

EDIT: Doesn't work. Try link at post #97 at this thread.

Edited by Wombat1940
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So, in conclusion.

Against SA6, SA11 and ships:

40000ft fly at 300Kts and fire Mavs at 18nm then break away.

20000ft fly at 400Kts and fire Mavs at 16nm then break away with engines on idle.

10000ft use Harms before 16nm.

Against SA17:

40000ft fly at 300Kts, fire Harms at 33nm and maintain speed.

20000ft fly at 400Kts, fire Harms at 24nm then break away with engines on idle or fire at 26nm using EMCON 5 then break away.

10000ft fly at 200Kts, fire Harms at 23nm and maintain speed.

These ranges have been tested on custom combat, always with rocket pods and other appropriate external AG weapons, using EMCON 1. Engine throttle was set as appropriate to each speed. I hope that helps someone. :)

That's really good stuff!!! :thumbsup:

I'm not qualified to validate (could I say question?) the figures, but hopefully others here will be able too. But its a start. I'm going to match them against my figures. Please understand this is in no way meant to be a criticism, but rather the way things should be so that we get it right. Home Fries might might want to start a fresh thread since what you are surmising is important to pilot knowledge. Could save a TAW2.0 pilot's life. Well done mate! :icon_bow:

Couple of questions.

What skill level were you testing under? Easy?

Did you have the same weapon loadout in all cases?

Were you flying at the same time of day?

Did you fly alone or with AI wingmen?

What's the ship's weapon(s)?

I wonder what the difference would be if you were using EMCON 5?

Like any testing: you need to keep the number of potential variables to a minimum or at least record the same in any conclusion.

This would make an excellent topic to discuss on TS3 with you, HF, Neph, Eagle, Flittop, Eagle, Sweeper, Hawkx, Bomber, Red ........... and me.

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