Jump to content
COMBATSIM Forum

Flight Sime Experience Info Requested PLEASE SEE INSIDE


Recommended Posts

Hey Guys,

I was talking with WomBat tonight and we had talked about a few things and I requested we should start a Thread to get Everyones Flight Sim Experience..

Now be a Noobie or a Flight General I would like to know this thread can also double as a Learning Guide on certain subjects..

I will first start Out with a little of my Flight sim History..

I got into Flight Sims back in 1988 with F19. I then a few years later found Red Baron a WWI sim and loved that game and learned my core components with that sim.. I would Highly Recommend a WWI sim To anyone wanting to learn the basics.. Rise OF Flight comes to mind..

Now I then moved over to TFX by Ocean Later to become DID.. I also had Strike Commander, Fleet Defender, I then one day stumbled on EF2000v2.0.. this was at the time my Most Realistic Flight sime I flown to date and was consumed by this game during my 1995-1999 years..

I had bought the EF200v2.0 Guide which had introduced me to Doghouse plots and terminology like P.K. (Probability of Kill)..

I would Highly Recommend reading this one Plus the TAW Stuff.. Really good info and the core of my Knolwedge for the DID Sims..

I used to play on T.E.N. a Multiplayer network at the time for some Online games especially EF2000v2.0.. I had learned by some of the Best there on T.E.N. and soon became a Renowned player on T.E.N..

I still have some of that core knowledge for Dogfighting from those days on T.E.N where youe best Teacher is Well shall I quote and old music reference, the saying is How does one get to Carnegie Hall, and a musician will answer this with Practise, Practise, PRactise..

Well I played more EF2000v2.0 then any one probally ever did would or could.. I loved that sim.. Then TAW Came out and the Graphics at the time where Jaw Dropping.. Altho I never quite was as good then flying the F22 then I was in the Typhoon I still loved it ..

I had played TAW since the ADF Days abd ever since with only a 1 year hiatis from the sim.. I been playing ever since. So Sometimes I take what I know for granit..Know I am an open kind of guy and mostly would love to share what I know to others but sometimes come off not as I should..

I just request that is one wants to know something all you need to do is A.S.K... I have trained guys and made them better Dogfighters then myself.. which is what I want to do make you a lean, mean Fighting machine..

I figure if you want help and you ask I can train you or at least give you some pointers as some of the other experienced pilots would hopefully share their knowledge as well.. We will all benefit in the Process and hopefully make it still enjoyable with not being too serious.. The main goal here is to have fun..

Well I want to hear YOUR Flight Sim History especially with TAW..Plus with the large number of players I would also like to point out we can do Base Defense sometime with cannons and bombs..

The objet is too Guard your base and also trying to take out the other guys base in the process. it is quite fun and you can really learn some good Dogfighting skills in the process. I almost forgot too add all my Falcon 4 days.. with SP3 , SP4,, Allied force and now BMS..

OK enough of this chatting lets get down to business, what you say..

dscf1169tt2.jpg

nephilimcorrectyr8.jpg

dscf0077.jpg

dscf0075.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the high points of my history of flight simming, starting in grade school with my Atari 800.

I got the bug early on with Sid Meier's original F-15 Strike Eagle for the Atari 800.

blog-0454921001368217024.png
Shooting down (and bombing) triangles while flying over a square grid was never so cool. I was actually bored by flight sims before that, mainly because SubLogic Flight Simulator (version 2 I think) had no detail and was slow on the computers of the day, but at least in F-15SE I could hit the "A" key and those squares started going by a lot faster. :icon_rock: The "AFTERBURNERS" line on the screen was pretty cool too, and I figured that had to be kind of like the jet's "turbo boost" (Knight Rider was on TV at the time).

The really cool discovery was when I upgraded from Arcade mode (where the plane actually drove like a car and the X axis yawed the aircraft, as opposed to rolled it) to the more realistic flight modes (where the aircraft rolls as advertised). It was then that I discovered that if you rolled, and then pulled back on the stick, you would turn a lot faster than if you just rolled! I know that this seems like second nature to everybody here, but to a grade school kid who was learning fractions at the time, discovering how vector based physics work was mind-blowing. I think this moment is when the bug really stuck with me.


The next simulation was the original Gunship by Andy Hollis.
586838-gunship-dos-screenshot-sa-8s.png
I flew this one on my dad's 4.77Mhz (yes, Virginia, that is a decimal point) XT with a monochrome monitor and keyboard (at least I had a classic Atari joystick on the 800). I eventually got good enough that my mission selection looked something like this:
146911-gunship-amiga-screenshot-choose-y 146912-gunship-amiga-screenshot-what-sty
Keep in mind that this sim actually deactivated your pilot if you died in the mission, so you were putting your character on the line every time you accepted a mission.

One particular mission I flew had the above criteria (Hazardous mission w/ the 3rd AD) I had loaded up with 16 Hellfires, 2 sidewinders (AIM-9 was used instead of AIM-92 in GS), and a full belt of 30mm Hate and Discontent. I bagged both primary and secondary objectives, but took a SAM hit on the second objective and had to limp home. However, the BMP platoon was still popping SAMs at me, so I turned around and engaged them. I had no Hellfires left, so I was down to the 30mm chaingun, which sufficed beautifully. I ended up burning just about all of my chaingun rounds, then headed back to the FARP, bagging a Hind along the way. So I was heading back with a damaged bird, a fuel leak, and my offensive capability was limited to screaming obscenities over the radio! I was thinking that "this is it, my awesome character is about to get wiped out" when i started getting more indications of damage. I could barely control the bird (and this was with a keyboard on high realism settings), but somehow got the FARP in sight and got in position for hover. Just as I was about 30 feet, my engine died and I landed hard.

I thought for sure I would see this:
586840-gunship-dos-screenshot-fatal-cras
but instead, the screen that came up was:
151341-gunship-amiga-screenshot-received
I also received a Purple Heart for that mission, and at that point I had every decoration and campaign ribbon in the game!

My Gunship campaigns took place in high school, where I was hoping and preparing for a career as a US Navy pilot. I received a NROTC scholarship and went to college as an engineering major, with a minor in flight sims.

My college years could be defined by 4 sims (or 3 sims and a game, depending on how you look at it):

There were, of course, more sims out there, but I was hamstrung with a 286-12 with an EGA monitor. How I ever got Falcon 3 to run in 604k conventional memory without a 386 still amazes me. However, I did add a math co-processor to my 286 so I could run the high fidelity flight mode (and also use MathCAD for my engineering work, but that was just the excuse I gave my parents for the funding).

It was also around my senior year that Thrustmaster came into being with their FCS (the first stick with a hat switch), based on the F-4 Phantom stick, and the WCS throttle, which daisy-chained with the keyboard and you flipped dip switches on the throttle to set your game. Before that, I was using my trusty 2-button CH stick for everything, with one hand on the keyboard for throttle control. Sounds like a pain now, but the first HOTAS experience was a game changer when it came to looking around and making minor throttle adjustments.

My senior year, as part of my package for selection into Naval Aviation I had to take the Aviation Qualification Test/Flight Aptitude Rating (AQT/FAR), which was since replaced by the Aviation Selection Test Battery, or ASTB. The FAR section of the exam involved having a picture from the cockpit of an aircraft at a particular attitude (normal or unusual), and a multiple choice of four diagrams of the aircraft from a 3rd person view. The idea was to look at the "in cockpit" diagram and determine what the plane was actually doing. I remember going into that exam with about 12 other people. When we got to that section just about everybody was making gestures with their hands trying to make sense of everything, while I was going through the exam thinking "damn! I wish I was in this plane doing that!". Needless to say, I aced the exam with a 7/9 (9/9 was the perfect score, and was unheard of until my roommate did it a few months later; he's been flying Hornets for 20 years now!).

Speaking of roommates, we were both Falcon 3.0 junkies, and the MiG-29 and Hornet expansions had come out. Modem protocols the way they were back then, we decided to get the same model 14.4k modems so that we could fly with/against each other (we had separate phone lines). During finals week that year, we spent so much time dogfighting that we would fly all night until we saw sunlight, then sleep until we had an exam (if we had one), then we would be awake at night for another round. At that point, we had both been selected for flight training (though my 20/40 vision qualified me only for the back seat :doh2: ), so all we really needed to do was pass our classes to get our officer commissions.

Flight Training Years.
Now that I was actually collecting a paycheck, I could afford a new rig. At the time, the Pentium 100MHz was king. During primary flight training, I rediscovered Microsoft Flight Simulator 5. It was perfect for what I was doing, because my training had nothing to do with fighting and everything to do with safe aircraft operations and procedures. I invested in a set of CH rudder pedals so I could practice coordinated turns and taxiing (my instructors always screamed at me for trying to taxi with the stick, which was what i had been virtually doing for years :rofl: ), and I even created my own NAS Pensacola scenery so I could practice at the field, including the VFR course rules for approach. This was also about the time that BAO FlightShop for FS5.x was released, and I was back in my fast movers flying over scenery. Fortunately, I had finished the FAM(iliarization) phase of flight training, and was into the instrument navigation phase, so I could use a more advanced avionics package than the C172 to perform my own training, and I would practice IFR flying with my MiG-29 (using the Lear 45 cockpit) :rofl:. The original US Navy Fighters was out about that time, and we would fly that for kicks.

I graduated to advanced flight training, and at that point everything I was learning was related to the back seat (e.g. radar navigation, grid navigation for high latitudes), so my down time could be better spent shooting at stuff. I started developing more MSFS scenery, including some VFR scenery of my hometown, for which I was asked (and gave) permission to put on a CD-ROM of freeware flight simulation add-ons. I also upgraded to the Thrustmaster F-16 FLCS and TQS, and discovered a highly realistic Su-27 Flanker simulator by Eagle Dynamics/SSI, which people may recognize as the origin of DCS. Having an attitude indicator that was not an artificial horizon was disorienting at first, but I learned to get used to it. For the first time, I discovered a sim that if I pulled the stick into my lap, I would exceed my desired AoA and my plane would slow its turn, and easing up on the stick would increase my turn rate. This was another eye-opener for me into realistic flight dynamics.
243168-su-27-flanker-dos-screenshot-the-

243169-su-27-flanker-dos-screenshot-look

243173-su-27-flanker-dos-screenshot-vapo

This was also the time that Jane's came on the scene and released ATF, the sequel to USNF. I had fun with that, but kept getting pulled back to Flanker.

In May of 1996, I earned my wings and reported to my operational training squadron (Fleet Replacement Squadron, or FRS). About this time, I also re-discovered Digital Integration's Tornado, which came out in 1993 but I couldn't fly because I had a 286. With what I now knew regarding tactical navigation and flight planning, I had a great time with the mission planner, and I thoroughly enjoyed being in the backseat of the Tornado during critical phases of the mission.
273290-tornado-dos-screenshot-pilot-s-co 273291-tornado-dos-screenshot-co-pilot-s

273288-tornado-dos-screenshot-mission-pl

My Operational Flying Days:
Despite this time being something of a Flight Simming Renniassance, my involvement with flight sims was more supporting the industry (i.e. picking up the titles) than actually playing. This is because I was gone half of the time (deployed), and when I was at home I was studying my NATOPS, so the last thing I wanted to do was crack open another manual. I actually spent a lot of time with Flight Simulator 98 because I could practice the fundamentals without having to learn new systems. Besides, when I was deployed, the only computer things I took were what I could fit into a single backpack. The upside of this: I got really good flying with a Sidewinder Freestyle controller!

It was during this timeframe that I stopped by a CompUSA in Tacoma, and they were offering a package deal regarding a $20 rebate if you purchased both F-22: ADF and EF2000 v2.0 together. This was my first experience with DID, and I picked the sims up. When I opened the box, there was nothing about any rebate, and when I went back to the store they gave me a BS line about "sometimes the company reps come in here and slap stickers on the boxes without telling us. Don't blame us." but wouldn't refund my money because the boxes were opened. I stopped shopping at that CompUSA store immediately, though in retrospect that was one of my best purchases despite being screwed out of a rebate (incidentally, I stopped shopping at CompUSA altogether when another store in a different state tried to screw me with unethical business practices).

I also made it a point to support my local EB Games store in Burlington, WA, so I picked up Jane's F-15, F-22: RSO and TAW when they became available (this time I did get the TAW rebate, :) ), but again due to my operational nature I never really dug into them. If there was any other sim I put time into, it was European Air War, which I could handle due to its relative system simplicity.

When Falcon 4.0 was released, I was deployed. However, I pre-ordered the Squadron Commander's Edition (with the 3 ring binder) from Amazon, and they shipped it to the FPO just in time for Christmas. I was running on my P2-300 Laptop with a 1st Gen ATI graphics accelerator at the time, so Falcon 4.0 ran like a pig, not to mention the steep learning curve. Again, I was spending enough time on my own aircraft that I didn't have time to learn a new set of avionics, so I put Falcon 4.0 on the shelf.

My Follow-On Operational Tour:
Following my squadron tour, I was assigned to a Battle Group Staff as a weapons officer. This was just the kind of break I needed to get back to simming, as I was already a qualified expert in my job, and I could take my HOTAS along with me on the ship. Because I had the same stateroom for the entire deployment, I had a decent HOTAS setup at my desk. This was also the time that Flanker 2.0 came out, and EECH was released in the USA (I already had EEAH). My same P2-300 laptop could run both of these nicely (though Flanker had to be run in 800x600, as 1024x768 would be too slow), and what down-time I had was often spent wasting tanks or practicing carrier traps with the Su-33. This is also when I refined my energy management and gunnery skills (to the point where I could hit individual engines) with the great Flanker flight model. One quick mission I recall was when I was fighting a furball of MiG-23s in the Su-27. I was pulling lead on a -23, and kicked in a little rudder to refine my gun solution, when I was hit in one of my engines by another -23. This resulted in an unrecoverable yaw, and I remember seeing my AoA go to max and my speedometer go to 0, and the screen start to go in circles. My first reaction was "So this is what a flat spin looks like." and next the realization that this was the first time I'd actually seen a legitimate spin in a flight sim (with the proper indications and everything), much less a flat spin. I don't think I ever enjoyed ejecting from an aircraft as much as I did that day.
326598-flanker-2-0-windows-screenshot-no

326607-flanker-2-0-windows-screenshot-ca
326602-flanker-2-0-windows-screenshot-ta

Incidentally, Flanker 2.0 was my introduction to skinning, as I self-taught myself Paintshop Pro and Photoshop to do custom skins for the Su-27.

Shore Duty and Beyond:
My last 2 1/2 years in the US Navy were spent on shore duty, and this was the time I was able to finally take Falcon 4.0 off the shelf. Fortunately, this also coincided with the release of SuperPak 1, so it was a good time to get back into Falcon. I invested in the Thrustmaster Cougar, and got myself a screaming Pentium 4 1.5GHz gaming rig. I also used what I saved on deployment to purchase my first house, so I had my first experience in creating a man cave :icon_rock: .

Falcon 4.0 and Flanker 2.5 were the sims I played most, along with a newcomer called IL-2 Sturmovik that got me interested again in WWII sims. IL-2 (and Forgotten Battles and its add-ons) would get lots of use for years to come. I futhered my skinning abilities with the IL-2 series, developing custom skins and pilots. It was also with IL-2 that the Black Veal Squadron was born.

However, as much as I loved the Flanker series, the original Lock On never really did it for me. Perhaps it was the graphics engine which brought my PC to its knees, but it never generated the spark that the originals did.

When Falcon 4.0: Allied Force came out, I jumped. Finally, the campaign engine was what it was meant to be, and I could have a Falcon install without "the dance". Times were good!

2008 to Present:
The IL-2 engine was starting to show its age, Falcon 4.0: Allied Force had split the Falcon community (I'll never understand destructive egos), and flight sims were disappearing from the scene. Then I saw a post here on Combatsim about Total Air War 2008 v.1R by "Jolly07" (later "Spear"). I figured that this might be the time to re-explore ADF/TAW. My tinkering instincts got the better of me, and I started asking Jolly questions on how to do things (such as going back to the original TAW menu of which I was a fan). I started testing for Jolly, one thing led to another, and the next thing I knew Jolly was telling me "I'm dropping off the internet; you got TAW 2008!"

The rest, as they say, is history*.


* Of course, during this time I have also been playing and modding Falcon BMS, DCS World, Strike Fighters 2, and anything else that crosses my path

Edited by Home Fries
moved here from blog entry
Link to post
Share on other sites

So did mine so I sent it to Ripley's......

...Believe it or Not... Well I choose NOT.. Cmon don't be shy post up your experience..or if you have any questions about TAW we can help..

Link to post
Share on other sites

...Believe it or Not... Well I choose NOT.. Cmon don't be shy post up your experience..or if you have any questions about TAW we can help..

First off let me tell you that I enjoy flying with you guys. It seems that I pick things up every week. With this in mind I can honestly say that at this point in time I don't have much spare time to practice and build my skills outside of our fly-ins. I have several other things going on including, but not limited to remodeling the entire second floor on my house. Many times we are like the keystone kops when flying a mission and our results usually show it. I can also understand the frustration the flight lead experiences when his crew can't hit a target. So I guess I have to weigh my options and act accordingly. When you invite everyone to fly regardless of their experience level and then get frustrated when you see their inexperience in MP it really sends a mixed signal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't sense any frustration last week about not being able to hit targets. We did Raid Egypt because Beachhead Prep crashed twice, and we knew going in that 1) we didn't read the brief ahead of time (so we didn't know our targets), and 2) only a few of us had free-lased before. If I got frustrated about anything, it was that the connection seemed to break down as we were approaching the Egypt coastline, which is no fault of anybody. Once that happened, I could no longer monitor the rest of my flight, and they were following a ghost since they weren't getting my updates.

Getting free-lasing done properly the first time is difficult, and it's even harder when you don't know your target area. At least if you know your target area, you can pick out major things like roads and follow them to your target with the LANTIRN. Honestly, at that point with the mission the way it was I would have been happy with people just picking a building and practicing on it. We really just needed more communication.

But back to the regularly scheduled topic. Knowing Wombat, I'm guessing he wanted to determine peoples' levels of experience so we could get a feel at a glance of who would be more comfortable in certain situations (i.e. flight lead or section lead, air to air vs air to ground, etc.) and who would be considered the best choices for mentoring others (a history of a common simulator helps with this). There's no "separating wheat from chaff" or any elitism going on here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I would still like to hear about your flight sim experience. The reason of this post it to get familiar with your Flight sim level and we can then act accordingly.. Now beit a noob or a veteren it can help or if you dont want to participate in revealing your flight sim experienece that will be ok..

I just thought if I was more familiar with your level We can act accordingly..You say MP like it is a different animal, it really is no different then Single Play except that you play with Real players..Now the Frustration was only on myPart and it was more of a curiosity. I had a brief look when we first started and everybody was chiming in about their not too good with LGB..

Well that is not a problem I feel we should have a tutorial on LGB. and I guess I can make one if you wouldnt mind and hopefully you can take some time from your what seems to be a very busy schedule.. I know about remodeling I did my House before and it consumed some 5 months of my life after work hours which made for some long hours..

So I understand your time is limited well that we know now.. So I will try and be brief but don't be put off by me or my being frustrated..I am quite harmless but mean well and I am not trying to make you feel as if noobs are not wanted..I hope you dont feel that way..I am thinking I should go and make that guide and hope you are not put off by myself..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well ... with my memory I'm lucky if I can remember what I flew yesterday. :rolleyes:

But its was something like this;

Lightening II

EF2000

SEF 2000

Flanker 2

ADF

TAW

IL2

Myst (wait a minute ..... was that a flight sim? ...... :rofl: )

Typhoon

Strike Fighters

Forgotten Battles - expansion pack

Pacific Fighters

Flaming Cliffs

Jane's FA-18

Falcon 4.0

Falcon AF (badly .....)

Falcon 4 BMS (briefly)

DCS (ever more briefly ...)

and TAW2.0

With all that experience you'd think I'd be able to taxi around a hanger or dodge a missile ..... but no. :spank:

And my biggest mistake? Constant use of the PAUSE button in single play ....... Be warned ..... it cripples you when you try multiplay and totally detracts for the thrill of the contest. :trustme:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll break down my sim experience into three groups: those that I spent a lot of time with; those that I dabbled in, but not enough to claim getting experience from; and then flight and other sims of different kind.

MY PRIMARY SIM EXPERIENCE

I started out with F-15 Strike Eagle for the Commodore 64. This would have been in the early to mid-1980s. Like Home Fries, I remember how satisfying it was shooting down or successfully bombing triangles. Somewhere in the documentation a real F-15 pilot remarks how close the sim is to the real thing. While he might have been trying to be kind, I think this shows that no matter how appealing the graphics, sims really take place in the mind.

f15.jpg

Next up was Project Stealth Fighter, again for Commodore 64. I really enjoyed this sim, and I loved the maps, manual and keyboard cheat sheet. I can still see that evening scene with the crescent moon moving slowly across the screen as you waited patiently for the sim to load every time you wanted to fly it (at least that’s how I remember it).

stealth.jpg

Somewhere in here I got Infiltrator and Infiltrator II. While this is really more of an arcade game, you had to fly a helicopter into the danger zone before beginning the ground mission. I remember how the main character was described: handsome, rock star, fighter jock, secret agent, etc. etc. The chopper had whisper mode, or something like that. It sucked up your available energy if you used it too long. You can see I was into this from the hand-drawn map I made of the compound and the floor drawings of the buildings.

infiltrator.jpg

I consider my first real flight simulator of the modern genre to be F-14 Fleet Defender. I also bought my first real joystick for this game, the Thrustmaster Flight Control System (FCS) and Weapons Control System (WCS). I wore it out. I loved Fleet Defender, and I liked going back and forth between the pilot and WSO seats. The radar system was a blast to learn and use. It was also during this time that I discovered the flight sim Newsgroup on Usenet. For any of you youngsters reading this, newsgroups and bulletin boards preceded today’s forums. Mailing lists preceded Twitter. But I digress…

f14.jpg

After Fleet Defender I went back in sim time. I saw Flight of the Intruder in a bargain bin somewhere. Before buying it I asked my virtual friends on the newsgroup if they played and liked it. Many had. I got a lot of medals in that sim. You could jump between aircraft during any given mission in this one. I recall jumping into the SEAD aircraft and clearing the way, then jumping back into my strike aircraft. PCs had progressed between the time this sim was released and when I got it. I had to run a utility called MoSlo, I believe, so that it wouldn’t run too fast.

intruder.jpg

Jane’s F-15 was next. Another great sim. The main complaint about this one was that it did not have a campaign mode. Fair criticism, I believe, but still fun to fly. I upgraded to the Saitek X36F/X35T HOTAS flight controller for this sim.

janes-f15.jpg

Somehow I missed F-22 Air Dominance Fighter and jumped right into Total Air War. I was well and thoroughly hooked and TAW became my one-and-only sim. I later purchased ADF. After progressing in TAW I drifted away from sims altogether. I thought my sim days were over… Wrong. Years later I got the urge and discovered the new TAW. I had already been aware of Combatsim.com from before, but now I’m a bit more active. I also upgraded to the Saitek X52Pro system for this. Bought a set for my son as well (the old Saitek system that I had given him bit the dust).

f22.jpg

SIMS I DABBLED IN

Sometime before or after Jane’s F-15 I took the Falcon 3.0 plunge. I really wanted to get into this sim as I had read so much about it and it’s fantastic campaign engine. However, I got lost in all of the patches, fixes, install sequences and so on. I lost interest and never got back to it. At some point I bought 4.0, but still never flew this sim, 3.0 or 4.0, beyond a few failed take-offs (a bug as I recall).

falcon3.jpg

falcon.jpg

Three sims I bought but never really did much with are EF 2000, Jane’s F-18 and Comanche Gold.

euro.jpg

f18.jpg

comanche.jpg

About a year ago, after getting back into TAW, I bought DCS A-10C Warthog. It ran at 3 fps on the PC I had at the time. That was a bummer. Not long after, I upgraded to a new PC for other reasons, but it should have no trouble with A-10C. I’ll install it again sometime down the road (I swear).

FLIGHT SIMS OF A DIFFERENT KIND

My life-long hobby has been model airplanes. It was inevitable that I would get a sim. I use RealFlight. It’s fun and a great learning tool. I learned how to fly RC helicopters from RealFlight.

realflight.jpg

I never got into Microsoft Flight Simulator, but more recently I have been using X-Plane. While this sim is used for a real flight experience, I use it for another reason. Related to my activities in RC aircraft, I have recently been involved in the amateur UAV activity. The autopilot that can be programmed to fly my RC plane for real can also be used to control a virtual plane, and this is what I use X-Plane for.

xplane.jpg

Although not a flight sim, it was those that lead me to Jane’s 688(I) submarine simulator. Another great experience.

688.jpg

Well, that’s it for me. Thanks for starting this thread, Neph.

Skeeter

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

My first contact with flight sim is Super EF2000. Back in the day I loved Star Wars X-wing very much and decided to try something with non-fictional aircraft. It is much harder than Space sim but I loved it though not very good at it.

I then bought Falcon 4.0 but it is a bit too hard for me and I don't have much time to train. Then LOMAC and F4AF, but didn't have time to really proficient with any of them. I feel more comfortable with EF2000 than any of them. I read about DiD's F-22 games but they didn't import them to Thailand.

Recently I tried to relive my childhood experience by setup 3DFX EF2000 in DOSBOX. I also found cheap F-15 Strike Eagle III Strategy book so I find F-15 SE3 and Falcon Gold to run in Dosbox too. then I found this site. And TAW 2.0 is so excellence. Now I train hard for a month with it, love it very much! The graphic is dated but very atmospheric, like EF2000! :) And it is much more forgiving than Falcon 4 and noob friendly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.......... then I found this site. And TAW 2.0 is so excellence. Now I train hard for a month with it, love it very much! The graphic is dated but very atmospheric, like EF2000! :) And it is much more forgiving than Falcon 4 and noob friendly.

So true. Makes me fell homesick for my PC back in Oz. But sing ken ken (no problems).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll break down my sim experience into three groups: those that I spent a lot of time with; those that I dabbled in, but not enough to claim getting experience from; and then flight and other sims of different kind.

MY PRIMARY SIM EXPERIENCE

I started out with F-15 Strike Eagle for the Commodore 64. This would have been in the early to mid-1980s. Like Home Fries, I remember how satisfying it was shooting down or successfully bombing triangles. Somewhere in the documentation a real F-15 pilot remarks how close the sim is to the real thing. While he might have been trying to be kind, I think this shows that no matter how appealing the graphics, sims really take place in the mind.

f15.jpg

Next up was Project Stealth Fighter, again for Commodore 64. I really enjoyed this sim, and I loved the maps, manual and keyboard cheat sheet. I can still see that evening scene with the crescent moon moving slowly across the screen as you waited patiently for the sim to load every time you wanted to fly it (at least that’s how I remember it).

stealth.jpg

Somewhere in here I got Infiltrator and Infiltrator II. While this is really more of an arcade game, you had to fly a helicopter into the danger zone before beginning the ground mission. I remember how the main character was described: handsome, rock star, fighter jock, secret agent, etc. etc. The chopper had whisper mode, or something like that. It sucked up your available energy if you used it too long. You can see I was into this from the hand-drawn map I made of the compound and the floor drawings of the buildings.

infiltrator.jpg

I consider my first real flight simulator of the modern genre to be F-14 Fleet Defender. I also bought my first real joystick for this game, the Thrustmaster Flight Control System (FCS) and Weapons Control System (WCS). I wore it out. I loved Fleet Defender, and I liked going back and forth between the pilot and WSO seats. The radar system was a blast to learn and use. It was also during this time that I discovered the flight sim Newsgroup on Usenet. For any of you youngsters reading this, newsgroups and bulletin boards preceded today’s forums. Mailing lists preceded Twitter. But I digress…

f14.jpg

After Fleet Defender I went back in sim time. I saw Flight of the Intruder in a bargain bin somewhere. Before buying it I asked my virtual friends on the newsgroup if they played and liked it. Many had. I got a lot of medals in that sim. You could jump between aircraft during any given mission in this one. I recall jumping into the SEAD aircraft and clearing the way, then jumping back into my strike aircraft. PCs had progressed between the time this sim was released and when I got it. I had to run a utility called MoSlo, I believe, so that it wouldn’t run too fast.

intruder.jpg

Jane’s F-15 was next. Another great sim. The main complaint about this one was that it did not have a campaign mode. Fair criticism, I believe, but still fun to fly. I upgraded to the Saitek X36F/X35T HOTAS flight controller for this sim.

janes-f15.jpg

Somehow I missed F-22 Air Dominance Fighter and jumped right into Total Air War. I was well and thoroughly hooked and TAW became my one-and-only sim. I later purchased ADF. After progressing in TAW I drifted away from sims altogether. I thought my sim days were over… Wrong. Years later I got the urge and discovered the new TAW. I had already been aware of Combatsim.com from before, but now I’m a bit more active. I also upgraded to the Saitek X52Pro system for this. Bought a set for my son as well (the old Saitek system that I had given him bit the dust).

f22.jpg

SIMS I DABBLED IN

Sometime before or after Jane’s F-15 I took the Falcon 3.0 plunge. I really wanted to get into this sim as I had read so much about it and it’s fantastic campaign engine. However, I got lost in all of the patches, fixes, install sequences and so on. I lost interest and never got back to it. At some point I bought 4.0, but still never flew this sim, 3.0 or 4.0, beyond a few failed take-offs (a bug as I recall).

falcon3.jpg

falcon.jpg

Three sims I bought but never really did much with are EF 2000, Jane’s F-18 and Comanche Gold.

euro.jpg

f18.jpg

comanche.jpg

About a year ago, after getting back into TAW, I bought DCS A-10C Warthog. It ran at 3 fps on the PC I had at the time. That was a bummer. Not long after, I upgraded to a new PC for other reasons, but it should have no trouble with A-10C. I’ll install it again sometime down the road (I swear).

FLIGHT SIMS OF A DIFFERENT KIND

My life-long hobby has been model airplanes. It was inevitable that I would get a sim. I use RealFlight. It’s fun and a great learning tool. I learned how to fly RC helicopters from RealFlight.

realflight.jpg

I never got into Microsoft Flight Simulator, but more recently I have been using X-Plane. While this sim is used for a real flight experience, I use it for another reason. Related to my activities in RC aircraft, I have recently been involved in the amateur UAV activity. The autopilot that can be programmed to fly my RC plane for real can also be used to control a virtual plane, and this is what I use X-Plane for.

xplane.jpg

Although not a flight sim, it was those that lead me to Jane’s 688(I) submarine simulator. Another great experience.

688.jpg

Well, that’s it for me. Thanks for starting this thread, Neph.

Skeeter

Skeeter - Every time I look at this I think of how ready you'll be if you ever decide to sell your software on eBay..!! :rofl:

Very nicely done. If I ever get around to this my list will look more like Wombat's...

Let's see what I can remember...

F19 or was it F119

Falcon 3.0

Joint Strike Fighter

FS2004

FSX

X-Plane 9

IL2

A10 Tank Killer

A10-C Warthog (learning)

DCS (learning)...

I might have missed some but who really cares? :shrug:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Iceman,

Thanks for you comments. I knew there must have been a reason that I hung on to all those sims, and this forum must be it! I doubt I'll ever sell them, but I doubt I'll ever load them on a PC again. You never know, though!

Paul

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't the finished product have to pass Eagle's muster before it gets admitted to DCSW?

It has already passed muster, else Iris would not have been provided the SDK. However, ED also gets the final call on whether the title will be DCS: F-14 Tomcat or F-14 Tomcat for DCS (i.e. "lite").

Do you consider FC3 module lite?

Referring to FC3 as "lite" is all relative. It's certainly lite when compared to Falcon BMS or DCS A-10C, but it's higher fidelity than something like Strike Fighters (which I consider a mid-grade sim).

If you read my blog entry regarding my flight sim experience, you'll notice that I have my share of "lite" sims along with the heavies, and I considered Su-27 Flanker 1.0 to be a heavy sim back in the day (before ramp starts and Falcon 4.0 type avionics). In short, I love FC3, and I fly it when I don't have the time or inclination for A-10C button mashing, but I'll never mistake it for A-10C either. It scratches a different itch, and it's also a great gateway sim.

What I was really getting at in my post (albeit inarticulately) was that Iris has a history of FS9/FSX add-on aircraft that tend to be at the survey level. They're lots better than Abacus, but nobody will confuse them with Captain Sim or PDMG. The F-14 (and especially the A model, which they're doing) has a limited mission (air intercept) and a lot of idiosyncrasies that scream for an advanced flight and avionics model. Fleet Defender did a great job of keeping it interesting, despite the air-to-air only role, because it modeled the backseat as well as the front seat, and did it with the fidelity that could be accomplished on a 486-33. If Iris makes a simplified Tomcat, it won't be near as satisfying as people might think, because the Tomcat isn't a dogfighter, the A model doesn't move mud, and without an AFM, you won't experience some of the idiosyncrasies that go with a first gen swing-wing fighter (e.g. asymmetric glove vanes at transonic speeds, the infamous approach turn stall with the A model, and the difference in roll rates and inertia between the swept wings and extended wings). Besides, This would also be a great plane for someone to fly as a RIO with an online pilot, but only if the systems were faithfully modeled.

IMHO, there are two airframes that absolutely scream to be modeled to the DCS standard: the F-14 (for reasons stated above, as well as its being an icon) and the F-15E (because it will inevitably be compared to Jane's F-15). We already have two 3rd party vendors working on the F-15E (one of which, RAZBAM, has a history of pushing realism to the limits of the FSX engine). I'm just hoping that Iris is up to the task.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...