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This Day in WWII 21 February 1942 - 1945


Donster
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WillysJeepAd-Feb1943.jpg Willys Jeep Ad - February 1943

1942: Convoy ON-166 (60 ships) sailing from Britain to North America, is attacked in the North Atlantic by 19 U-boats from wolfpacks Ritter and Knappen between the 21st and 26th February. 14 allied ships are lost for 87,901 tons. 4 U-boats U-225, U-606, U-529, U623 were sunk during the battle.

1943: The 25th Anniversary of the creation of the Red Army is celebrated in all allied countries.

Louise%20Allbritton1.jpg *Louise Allbritton

1944: U.S. Marines complete the capture of Eniwetok Atoll, suffering 339 dead.

1944: Hideki Tojo becomes chief of staff of the Japanese army.

Louise%20Allbritton2.jpg Louise Allbritton

1945: The US 8th Air Force launches another heavy attack (over 1,000 bombers) against Nürnberg.

1945: The British 2nd Division establishes another Irrawaddy bridgehead, while the British 36th Division breaks through at Myitson, in northern Burma. Meanwhile further British forces cross the Irrawaddy in central Burma.

1945: The 1st Ukrainian Front captures Guben.

Louise%20Allbritton3.jpg Louise Allbritton

*Louise Allbritton was the only child of L.L. and Caroline Greer Allbritton and was born on July 3, 1920 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Soon after her birth, the family moved to Wichita Falls, Texas, where her father owned and operated the local traction system. Louise's mother Caroline died when Louise was a very young child and her father was left to cope with Louise's determination to become an actress. He sent her to the University of Oklahoma where she studied journalism but after two years, quit and moved to California where she joined the Pasadena Playhouse. While apprenticing there, she tried unsuccessfully to get film work but was told she was too tall. She remained at the Pasadena Playhouse where she performed lead roles in several productions but without film work she began to think she would move back to Texas and life on the 100,000 acre ranch with her father. As so often happens (particularly in the movies), a scout from Columbia Pictures happened to catch her matriculating on stage and offered her a role in an upcoming Fay Wray-Paul Kelly film called "Not a Ladies Man" (1942). Which stunk. Shortly after that film's release, Louise was in another Columbia stinker -- "Parachute Nurse" (1942). Louise claimed she played the parachute. Soon after, Louise signed a seven year contract with Universal, a company not well-renowned for promoting their actors. Universal was known, however, for firing actors (and they in turn found stardom at other studios) and their horror pictures. Her best starring assignment during her Universal years was the whimsical heroine in the captivating comedy "San Diego I Love You" (1945). By 1948, however, Louise was mired in "other woman" and secondary roles; she is quite good in this capacity in Universal's "The Egg and I" (1947), but the film's best lines and bits of business went to stars Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray. Louise only made 23 films (actually 24 but the last has never been released). During this time, she met a real life war correspondent through her good friend Carole Landis -- Charles Collingwood -- who became Louise's husband.

Louise%20Allbritton4.jpg Louise Allbritton

Louise Allbritton retired from films in 1949, spending the rest of her life traversing the globe in the company of her husband, peripatetic CBS news correspondent Charles Collingwood.

Louise Allbritton died from spinal cancer on February 16, 1979 (aged 58) in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

TRIVIA:

Height: 5' 7" (1.70 m)

While filming "Son of Dracula" (1943), she and her costar Robert Paige were constantly playing jokes on their cast mates. One day, costar Pat Moriarty and Robert Paige were filming a scene where they flip open her Albritton's character's coffin. They were astonished upon opening the lid to find Albritton inside, completely naked.

WillysJeepAd-Feb1944.jpg Willys Jeep Ad - February 1944

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