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So Long Mr. Spock


Donster
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Mine also. I watched the TV series when it first aired. Then after it went into syndication, most days after coming home from school. Being the late '60's and early '70's, with the NASA being in its heyday, with constant missions, with new achievements with almost every launch into space, gave us hope for the future of space, and Star Trek helped us dream on how it could possibly be in the future.

“We are assembled here today to pay final respects to our honored dead. And yet it should be noted, in the midst of our sorrow, this death takes place in the shadow of new life, the sunrise of a new world; a world that our beloved comrade gave his life to protect and nourish. He did not feel this sacrifice a vain or empty one, and we will not debate his profound wisdom at these proceedings. Of my friend, I can only say this: Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most… human.” ~ Captain James T. Kirk

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God damn nicotine addiction! Nimoys COPD stemmed from his smoking from many years back. I quit when I started running in my 40s thank God, but I too have COPD, albeit mildly. My wifes sister, a heavy smoker, now has lung cancer from it, and is in Chemo, lost all her hair and probably won't make it. Why do we continue to put tobacco profits ahead of the lives of people? God damn nicotine and the Tobacco Companies!

RIP, Mr Spock, you deserved better.

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Because it's a free country, Whiz. We tried banning alcohol and we see how that turned out. We have been trying to ban drugs, but that has not worked out either. Banning tobacco is slowly being enacted, but it just creates a black market and more crime. As I understand it, Mr. Nimoy took the responsibility for his smoking, he did not play the blame game.

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I began smoking Lucky Strikes when they were 22 cents a pack, I think I was about 18 years old. I quit when I was about 35. I got away from pipes and cigars and finally the Red Man chew when I was about 45. My wife Cherie began smoking when she was 16, being from Niagra NY, I can understand that. I gave her one of those electric cigarettes with her beloved milk chocolate flavor. I still catch he puffing on her hidden cigarettes. She is 71 now and her health is failing. I thank the lord for giving me the will power to quit. I try to encourage her to stop, I've tried but she is really addicted. I continue to encourage her to quit but without success. I do believe however that the people should have the right to smoke if they so choose. The government has too much control over our lives as it is.

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I have to acknowledge the validity of both your arguments, Stans and TCat, as I agree with both of you. I, too, wish less government intrusion in our lives. But how, then, do we counteract the power of the Marketing Forces that hook young people on nicotine? It has to start there to do any good, because later is too late. Maybe I'm whistling in the wind when the love of the Almighty Dollar is being questioned.

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I don't see near as much marketing force for tobacco as I do against it. "Big Tobacco" is restricted to where it can advertise, and I've only seen the ads in Playboy (which I've read for the articles :rofl: ), and I imagine other adult magazines (same pubs that can advertise hard liquor). If I had to guess, though, the most effective pro-tobacco marketing force is peer pressure, and therefore the most effective force against it should be strong parenting.

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Marketing for tobacco has pretty much gone away. Cigarette vending machines are a thing of the past. In order to get tobacco now, you must show ID at the counter of a store. I agree with Home Fries, peer pressure is what gets the majority of people into tobacco.

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Points well taken, gents. As usual, I'm living in the 60's and remembering Camel ads! Eventually, I guess, we'll look back at people smoking as vestiges of "Those bad old days" and "How could they have been so stupid" just as kids today look at us and shake their heads over our former lives.

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Kids are even dumber now. They have replaced cigarettes, which aren't near as bad when you compare them to what they are using now. Meth, Crack Cocaine, Heroin, Synthetic Marijuana etc. Some of the stuff they are smoking, ingesting, injecting, snorting, sniffing and shoving up their butts are right out from the paint department of your local hardware store. Yes, some of this stuff like Marijuana and Heroin have been around for hundreds of years. But this stuff they are cooking and using is just mind boggling to me. And we wonder why so many children are born with ADD and other major mental and physical disabilities. Their parents, who many are just kids themselves, are making mutants out of their offspring with chemicals.

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