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This Day in WWII 21 October 1939 - 1945


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WesternElectricAd-October1943.jpgWestern Electric Ad - October 1943

1939: The Luftwaffe starts attacks against North Atlantic convoys.

1939: As war heats up with Germany, the British war cabinet holds its first meeting in the underground war room in London.

1939: The Germans start deporting Poles from Posen (Poznan), largest city of western Poland (250,000 people), in their attempt at establishing "pure and Germanic provinces" in Poland.

Dale%20Evans1.jpg*Dale Evans

1940: Churchill broadcasts to France, 'Frenchmen rearm your spirits before it is too late.'

1941: Units of 6th Army capture Stalino in the industrial Donets Basin.

Dale%20Evans2.jpgDale Evans

1942: The South Africa Premier, Field-Marshal Smuts, makes a historic speech to both Houses of Parliament saying, 'The stage is set for the last, the offensive stage'.

1942: Eight American and British officers land from a submarine on an Algerian beach to take measure of Vichy French to the Operation Torch landings.
 

WesternElectricAd-October1944.jpgWestern Electric Ad - October 1944

1944: Aachen finally falls to the U.S. First Army, earning the distinction of being the first German city to be captured. 12,000 German prisoners have been taken since the 2nd October. Breskens is captured by the Canadians, but fighting continues for 10 more days in the pocket.

1945: The U-boat pens in Hamburg are blown up by British Engineers using German explosives.

Dale%20Evans3.jpgDale Evans

*Born Lucille Wood Smith in Uvalde, Texas, her name was changed in infancy to Frances Octavia Smith. She had a tumultuous early life, eloping at the age of 14 with her first husband, Thomas F. Fox. She bore one son, Thomas F. Fox, Jr., when she was 15. Divorced in 1929 at age 17, she married August Wayne Johns that same year, a union that ended in divorce in 1935.

She took the name Dale Evans in the early 1930s to promote her singing career. She then married her accompanist and arranger Robert Dale Butts in 1937. In 1947 she married Roy Rogers. The marriage was his third and her fourth. Dale had a son from her first marriage, Tom Jr. Roy had an adopted child, Cheryl, and two natural children, Linda and Roy (Dusty) Jr., from his second marriage. Evans and Rogers together had one child, Robin, and adopted four others: Mimi, Dodie, Sandy, and Debbie. They were married for 51 years.

After beginning her career singing at the radio station where she was employed as a secretary, Evans had a productive career as a jazz, swing, and big band singer that led to a screen test and contract with 20th Century Fox studios. She gained exposure on radio as the featured singer for a time on the Edgar Bergen/Charlie McCarthy show.

During her time at 20th Century Fox, the studio promoted her as the unmarried supporter of her teenage "brother" Tommy (actually her son Tom Fox, Jr.). This deception continued through her divorce from Butts in 1946, and her development as a cowgirl co-star to Roy Rogers at Republic Studios.

Dale%20Evans4.jpgDale Evans

Evans married Roy Rogers at the Flying L Ranch in Davis, Oklahoma, on New Year's Eve 1947. Rogers ended the deception regarding Tommy. Rogers and Evans were a team on- and off-screen from 1946 until Rogers' death in 1998. Together they had one child, Robin Elizabeth, who died of complications of Down Syndrome shortly before her second birthday. Her life inspired Evans to write her bestseller Angel Unaware. Evans was very influential in changing public perceptions of children with developmental disabilities and served as a role model for many parents. After she wrote Angel Unaware, a group then known as the "Oklahoma County Council for Mentally Retarded Children" adopted its better-known name Dale Rogers Training Center in her honor. Evans went on to write a number of religious and inspirational books.

From 1951 to 1957, Dale Evans and her husband starred in the highly successful television series "The Roy Rogers Show", in which they continued their cowboy and cowgirl roles, with her riding her trusty buckskin horse, Buttermilk. Alice Van-Springsteen served as a double for both Evans and Gail Davis, the actress who starred in the syndicated series Annie Oakley, often performing such tasks as tipping over wagons and jumping railroad track. In addition to her successful TV shows, more than thirty films and some two hundred songs, Evans wrote the well-known song "Happy Trails." In later episodes of the television program, she was outspoken in her Christianity, telling people that God would assist them with their troubles and imploring adults and children to turn to Him for guidance.

Dale%20Evans5.jpgDale Evans

In the fall of 1962, the couple co-hosted a comedy-western-variety program, "The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show", which aired on ABC. It was canceled after three months, losing in the ratings to the first season of The Jackie Gleason Show, another comedy-variety program, on CBS.

In the 1970s, Evans recorded several solo albums of religious music. During the 1980s, the couple introduced their films weekly on the former The Nashville Network. In the 1990s, Dale hosted her own religious television program.

Evans died of congestive heart failure on February 7, 2001 (aged 88) in Apple Valley, California, two and a half years after the death of her fourth husband Roy Rogers.

TRIVIA:

Nickname:
Queen of the West
Queen of the Cowgirls

Height: 5' 4" (1.63 m)

WesternElectricAd-October1945.jpgWestern Electric Ad - October 1945

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