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This Day in WWII 22 March 1940 - 1945


Donster
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Bendix%20Aviation%20Ad%20-%20March%20194Bendix Aviation Ad - March 1943

 

1940: U-boats sink seven neutral ships.

 

1942: Late in the afternoon after an unsuccessful Italian torpedo-aircraft attack, Admiral Iachino's squadron engages the British convoy. This protected itself with a smokescreen, but the cruiser HMS Cleopatra was damaged. Admiral Philip Vian, commanding the British escorts, now sent his destroyers in a torpedo attack on the Italian battleship Littorio. However, by now it was getting dark and so Admiral Iachino turned away from the British convoy and sailed for home.

 

JuneHaver.jpg *June Haver

 

1942: A Polish newspaper editor is beheaded for listening to the BBC, as German terror continues in Poland.

 

1942: Japanese aircraft attack Darwin.

 

JuneHaver2.jpg June Haver

 

1943: German troops recapture Belgorod.

 

1943: Newly built gas chamber/crematory IV opens at Auschwitz.

 

JuneHaver3.jpg June Haver

 

1944: Alexander halts the frontal attacks on Cassino.

 

1944: British tanks rout a Japanese tank force at Tamu in India.

 

JuneHaver4.jpg June Haver

 

1945: The U.S. First Army's bridgehead at Remagen is now 30 miles long. Units of the US Third Army cross the Rhine at Oppenheim south of Mainz against minimal German resistance.

 

1945: The Japanese, facing food shortages at home and among their troops, launch a 60,000-man offensive to seize the wheat crop in central China near Hankow.

 

JuneHaver5.jpg June Haver

 

*June Haver was born on June 10, 1926, in Rock Island, Illinois, with the birth name of June Stovenour. Her parents divorced at an early age and she was adopted by Bert Haver, her stepfather. Her mother and new father moved to Cincinnati, where she appeared on the stage for the first time at the age of six in a local theater production of "Midnight in a Toyshop". Very soon after, June was winning musical contests around the Queen City. By 1936, little June and her mother had returned to the city of her birth, after a film screen test the year before. It was here that she blossomed even further with her singing, appearing on local radio. Later, while touring with various musical bands, June and her mother found their way to sunny California, in the entertainment mecca of Los Angeles. While in high school, she played in various secondary productions. In 1942, at the age of 16, June joined Fox Studios as a fringe actress. Dropped because the studio thought she was too young, they signed her the following year to appear in "The Gang's All Here" (1943). It was an uncredited part, but a start in the film world, nonetheless. Unless one looked hard, she would have been easy to miss in the film. Her next one with Fox was in 1944's "Home in Indiana" (1944). But it was her next film where she was able to showcase her acting talent in "Irish Eyes Are Smiling" (1944). In 1945, she appeared in "Where Do We Go from Here?" (1945) with her future husband, Fred MacMurray, who she wed in 1954. It was the only film the two of them would be in together. In 1946, at the age of 20, June got top billing for the first time in "Three Little Girls in Blue" (1946). Her only other film that year was "Wake Up and Dream" (1946). After only one film in 1947, June resurfaced the next year in the utterly forgettable "Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay!" (1948). This was one of the starting vehicle's for a rising talent named Marilyn Monroe. In 1949, June was in two productions. They were "Look for the Silver Lining" (1949) and "Oh, You Beautiful Doll" (1949). By now, it was obvious that she was being groomed to take over the Fox throne held by Betty Grable. It was not to be, because June was about to leave films, altogether. The filming of 1953's "The Girl Next Door" (1953) proved to be her last silver screen appearance. She had announced, the year before, that she would become a nun after her contract ran out. She had been engaged to studio dentist, John Duzik when he died unexpectedly from complications from surgery. Shortly afterward, in February of 1953, true to her word, she joined a convent in Xavier, Kansas with the intention of becoming a nun. Was happy there until a serious illness forced her to leave and return to California in September 1953. Although she had planned to return to the convent after her recovery, she never did.

 

It was after she left the convent that she was seen with Fred MacMurray. After they were wed, the couple adopted twin girls. June's last foray into the glare of the camera lights was when she played herself in the television production of "The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour" (1957). She died of respiratory failure in Brentwood, California on July 6, 2005.

 

JuneHaver6.jpg June Haver

TRIVIA:

Measurements: 34-23-35

Her sisters followed her to Hollywood and served as her stand-ins, while her mother was Haver's personal secretary.

First husband, Jimmy Zito, was a trumpeter whom she met while performing as a teenage "big band" singer. The marriage lasted barely a year (1947-1948).

Nicknamed the "pocket Grable," she was making $3,500 a week at 20th Century Fox when she said goodbye to it all and became a novice nun in the Sisters of Charity convent.

In 1996 she sold her and her late husband's 1,500-acre Healdsburg ranch to the Gallo family. She maintained a home in Brentwood. She died in her Brentwood estate in 2005.

EvansProductsCompany-March1944.jpg Evans Products Company Ad - March 1944

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40 minutes ago, Donster said:

Bendix%20Aviation%20Ad%20-%20March%20194Bendix Aviation Ad - March 1943

 

The USAAC was the first to embrace the electric aircraft engine starter, first with inertia starters, then later direct cranking starters.  The USN continued to rely upon the old Coffman cartridge starter system for carrier aircraft, due to its simplicity and it was much lighter in weight than any electric starter motor and did not require a fully charged aircraft battery or external power source.  USN and USMC pilots did not always appreciate the Coffman system as it sometimes required several changes of the cartridge to get an engine to start.  During WW II, the USN did switch over to electric starter motors.

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42 minutes ago, Stans said:

 

The USAAC was the first to embrace the electric aircraft engine starter, first with inertia starters, then later direct cranking starters.  The USN continued to rely upon the old Coffman cartridge starter system for carrier aircraft, due to its simplicity and it was much lighter in weight than any electric starter motor and did not require a fully charged aircraft battery or external power source.  USN and USMC pilots did not always appreciate the Coffman system as it sometimes required several changes of the cartridge to get an engine to start.  During WW II, the USN did switch over to electric starter motors.

And did you know that the Japanese "push started" their aircraft. :D

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6 hours ago, Itchie Crotchie said:

Donstel-san a molon! Itchie's Zelo havie erectric stalt and powel canopy arong withie Sony 12 speakel steleo system!

 

BANZAI! BANZAI! BANZAI!

 

Your Zero was so well constructed that it fell apart when you stepped onto its wing.

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