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Military History: Invasion Japan Article


Donster
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Outstanding article!!! I tend to doubt the claims that the Japanese actually had a working nuclear device, but it might be possible. I doubt that Kim Jung Il is going to let anybody look at the former Japanese research area, so we may never know for certain.

With the collapse of Germany, Japan was on its own for developing new weapons. I think they had sufficient knowledge to build guided missles and jet aircraft, but did they the materials for construction and fuel? By mid 1945 Japan was pretty much isolated and with the Soviets entering the Pacific war, would they have been able to import any of the raw materials that they lacked on the their home islands?

I do believe that an invasion of Japan, even in her weakened state, would have cost hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of lives. As it stands, two nuclear bombs were detonated and the second bomb did bring about the end of the war. Nuclear war is certainly not pretty, no form of war is pretty, but the devastation of an invasion is likely to have been far worse.

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Uh, hey, thanks for the comments. Glad it tickled you all. For sure, I have concluded that the planners certainly didn't have everything factored in for invasion scenarios. And the Jap nuke newspaper story came out in 1946 but has never been brought up since. We didn't even know about their bio/chemical units that experimented in China and LOTS of other stuff.

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Thought I would share this opinion that appeared in today's local paper...

WORLD WAR II

Victims of atomic bomb were the last of many in that war

By David Chung

Predictably, with the 60th anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the last several days, we hear people complain that the bombings were unnecessary, unjustified and immoral. Over time, the victims of these bombings have taken on heroic stature.

But as an American, before I honor the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, I choose to honor the victims of the Bataan Death March and the victims of the rape of Nanking. I choose to honor the U.S. pilots who were tortured, murdered and cannibalized on Chichi Jima. I choose to honor the soldiers, sailors, pilots and Marines who fought to defeat Japan. I choose to honor the scientists of the Manhattan Project and the men of the Enola Gay and Bockscar who dropped the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

My mother grew up on the Pacific island of Guam. One day as she was leaving church after a Christmas program, the bombing started. She had been an angel in the program and was still wearing wings. My grandfather went to take his post along with the hundred or so U.S. Marines and Guam Guard members then under arms. The island forces were no match for the Japanese invasion, and soon they were captured.

My mother spent her childhood under Japanese occupation. She often had to be hidden under floorboards because English was her first language. She had a firsthand view of atrocities committed by the emperor’s troops. Horrible as it was, my mother’s experiences paled next to those of the survivors of Bataan and Nanking.

By 1945, Imperial Japan had been at war for almost 15 years. The bushido culture, taught to Japanese from infancy, made every Japanese man, woman and child a soldier. Even after the near total destruction of Japan’s navy at Leyte Gulf, and with Japanese soldiers stranded and starving all across the Pacific, the emperor would not give up.

In this war, there could be no return to ‘‘status quo ante.’’ Japan had to surrender unconditionally. Instead of preparing to surrender, the emperor was preparing his people to fight to the death. Hirohito told his people to fight to the end, and he spoke of the millions who would fall in the Allied invasion of Japan as ‘‘shattered jewels.’’

Even after the Hiroshima bomb, Japan did not surrender. It was only after the Nagasaki bomb that the emperor made his famous radio broadcast to the Japanese people. The atomic bomb changed everything. Hirohito cited the bomb as the reason for the surrender.

As a child of the Cold War, I grew up in the era of bomb shelters and duck-and-cover drills. I understand that in this era of global terrorism, the threat of nuclear attack remains high. Even so, my only regret about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is that it came too late to help the people of Burma, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, China, Korea, the Kil Islands, the Philippines, Malaysia, Cambodia, Indonesia, Guam, Burma, Viet Nam, Borneo, Thailand, Hong Kong and Singapore.

David Chung is a Cedar Rapids-based computer consultant. His parents were professors at the University of Northern Iowa, and his childhood was split between Iowa and several years on Guam. He has been in Cedar Rapids for 13 years and works with clients across the country.

Well written in IMHO. :thumbsup:

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Even the History Channel is buying into the fiction that Japan was a beaten country by their spin on things. All the era documentation I've read concerned getting ready for the mother of all battles since the intel was that they'd fight to the last man, woman and child and we'd suffer lots of casualties using Iwo and Okinawa as yardsticks.

It's just another flawed case of projecting modern values and attitudes back in time and coming up with perverted, revisionist retrospective.

Do you guys remember if Combatsim published an article I did in the old days about Jap war crimes? Don't think it ever got up. Anyhow I have been researching their bio/chemical units activities before and during the war in China. I will probably revise the theme and have a multi part story with some details on the heinous crap they perpetrated.

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And it's real easy for people to sit back today and say what should have been done 60 years ago. Fact is, we had no idea just how strongly or weakly the Japanese might have defended their home islands, all the information available at that time would have been based on previous battle experiences, which were always fought hardily. It's important to remember our history, lest we repeat its mistakes, but it is equally important that we do not try to relive history or change history.

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Part of the problem is simply the changeover of generations. Younger people have only known the Japanese as eccentric people who make small cars and like watching giant robots on TV. In their minds they can't conceive of the old war crimes or death cult. Japan of course wants to forget it more than anyone.

Bill Clinton's apology to Japan didn't help things either. My WWII vet grandad was not happy about that. He served in the Pacific and thought it was necessary to use the nukes. But it was not old hatred that motivated it (he bought a Japanese car around the same time).

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Beyond what WE think of the Japs, in today's paper is a story about how the other Asians STILL hate them and burn their flags after 60 years. Ever see a Chinese Kung fu movies where they didn't somehow bring out how they feel about the Japanese?

Unlike the Germans who publicly feel remorse for what went down in WW2 the Japanese cheerfully have no such conscience.

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