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Stans
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I am still having connection problems with my cable internet. Problems started in the middle of September, 2005. On holidays and many weekends, my connection is poor, during the week the connection is excellent. My ISP contends and is persistant in the problem lying in my router, my modem, my computer, even though an on-site service call turned up no problems. I have spent this afternoon running speed tests. Download is consistantly 5.7 MBps to 6.1 MBps which is normal. Upload has ranged from 9 to 159 Kbps, normal range is 350 to 360 Kbps. I am interested in your theories. ISP issue or my problem? :unsure:

Update: At 6:43 PM, my download speeds remain the same, upload speeds have mysteriously returned to normal.

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what's your rig Stans?

I had troubles once, they came out and said it was somewhere in the neighborhood box...they restrung my line and a few days later I was back to full speed....

Are you wireless?

What's your router?

when you notice these slowdowns, what else are you running?

Cheers

Doc

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Are you wireless? No

What's your router? Linksys Etherfast Cable/DSL, 4 port switch

when you notice these slowdowns, Yesterday, after 7:15 PM, Today it was slow until around 10 AM, then fine, then ultra slow from 1:15 PM to 6:43 PM, now running perfect. So far, slow downs are on holidays and weekends, usually fine during the week.

what else are you running? AVG antivirus, Spyware Blaster, and Win XP firewall.

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Off hand and having no experince with cable internet, but quite willing to open my yap and spout off anyways................ :rofl:

Since it seems that it is the upload (ie data moving out of your location), then the problem must be within your equipment or location on the "superhighway".

Is there a way that you can test what's comin' out your PC (what speed) before it hits the outside connection?

As for regular "problem" times.....Once worked for a company in mid-coast Maine. In May/June of one year, the Mainframe would crash every Friday afternoon, around 2PM, due to a power fault. We had Central Maine Power in the shop hooking up meters and what not. Come to find out that the reason why was that there were a lot of summer camps in the area, and people would be opening up camp on a Friday afternoon, getting water systems going, plugging in stoves, refridge's, etc.

CMP quickly re-routed our power lines. Never had the problem again.

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Since my problems occur on weekends and holidays, I'm leaning towards it being an ISP problem. New houses built in my area, ISP may be just hooking them up to the same line I'm on and there is only so much bandwidth available on one line. Either that, or someone is running an FTP server somewhere upstream from me. The big downfall of cable is that the more people on one line, the slower the bandwidth and the person closest to the node will get the most and the person at the very end of the line will get the least.

Oh, and during the Christmas to New Year period, I usually had poor connection from 10 or 11 AM until 7 or 8 PM, from December 23 through January 1, on January 2 the connection returned to normal. The days of poor connectivity also coincided with the holiday schedule for the local public schools.

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right I understand that, but what I'm saying is:

Prove that your equipment is not slowing down during those hours. Can you monitor the speed at the connection between the PC(s) and the outside world and show a constant high speed output from your equipment?

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Not sure how to go about monitoring the output from my computer to the modem. And why would my pc slow down at specific times and days, but never at the exact same times (ie, something like pre-programmed software updating times)? And why did this start in September? I've been running this computer since May, had Comcast cable ISP for about three years. No problems until September of this past year. And the modem is brand new, Comcast said my old modem was probably the problem, so I bought a new Motorola modem, exact same problems. And removing the router and disabling firewall and anti-virus software makes no difference.

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You're on Cable, and Weekends and Holidays slow down?

It's your provider....kiddies are off from school on weekends and holidays and most likely your provider is unable to handle the increase in traffic/bandwidth use....

If your system works great other hours, and not on weekends/holidays...it has to be thier system....

Doc

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You're on Cable, and Weekends and Holidays slow down?

It's your provider....kiddies are off from school on weekends and holidays and most likely your provider is unable to handle the increase in traffic/bandwidth use....

If your system works great other hours, and not on weekends/holidays...it has to be thier system....

Doc

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Not according to Comcast. Standard answer to all problems is "it's your system, ours is fine, you need to schedule an on-site service call." How many times do I have to do this before they figure out it ain't my system that's the problem? :angry:

Oh, speeds are just fine this morning, likely to remain that way until next weekend. <_<

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Yep I suspect you are loosing bandwidth to your neighbors. Keep a log of the actual speed reports for a few weeks and then you can show them some facts on when the slowdown occurs. If it is sapped bandwidth though you might be out of luck since it is not really a technical error.

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Sorry, but screw what Comcast is telling you. That has been a consistant problem with cable modems from Day-1. The times are consistant with "Peek" hours. They can scream it aint their problem but it is.

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Ok, I had the opportunity to come home for lunch today and check my internet connection. Extremely slow upload this morning, I quit trying around 06:35. At 12:00 I am getting blazing fast upload and download speeds, further leading me to believe that there is either an excessive number of subscribers hooked onto this cable line or someone is making massive uploads of movies and/or music before and after work or school.

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Cable connection speed is dependent on the number of users...plain and simple. If there is a guy in your neighbourhood running some sort of internet business ( or a porno site ) they will suck up all your bandwidth.

DSL is independent of the number of users , but overall is slower than cable. If your cable ISP is on the ball and puts in more hubs as the number of users increase and upgrades to better fibre...then you will be fine...it sounds to me like your ISP is screwing you around. They can do a remote test and check upload and download speeds anytime.

BTW I have cable and it's great but in other parts of the City DSL works better.

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Yeah, well, Comcast seems to have a reputation for screwing their customers. This slow down crap started recently and the times are usually when the kids are out of school. If it's a porno site, then it will be gone as soon as Comcast figures it out. Same for an illegal movie or music server.

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Stans, just caught this. I was a Roadrunner tech for a good few years and slowdowns are a part of the problem although it is a two part problem. If there is a high density area that is fed off the same fiber distribution node that you are on then slowdowns will/can occur. The problem is usually caused by sudden increase in traffic, ie when kids get home as already stated or if there is a library/school or other public place where high internet traffic might occur at those same times.

The second part of the problem is, potentially, ingress getting into the return (or forward path) of the cable signal at those times. This is usually due to a crack in the cable that is allowing external signals to interfere with the delicate forward and return characteristics of modern digital cable signal distribution. This can come from any number of sources but can be detected by the cable company if they have a regular signal leakage prevention/detection program..who knows with Comcast?!

The bottom line is it is Comcasts issue, in the first case they didn't design for the amount of subscribers in that node region or the sub count has increased in which case they need to consider adding a second node. In the latter case it's sloppy preventative maintenance!

A bit long winded but there you have it! :)

Ogs.

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A Comcast technician just called me, said there had been a number of complaints coming from my area. Yesterday, they tracked the problem to a poorly grounded circuit. He said that a poorly grounded circuit would allow normal download speeds, but when the modem tries to upload, it can't overcome the excess electrical activity in the line, so it just keeps re-sending the same signal until it gets through. The end result is a very slow upload speed.

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Bad grounds at amplifier stations can cause that and it's known as "common path distortion" It's not directly an electrical problem but that's a simple and effective explaination. It sounds like they have a good handle on it.

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